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Attorney-General's Department Graduate Programs

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The Attorney-General's Department is one of the top graduate employers that offer a flexible and inclusive working environment. The department is the heart of Australian Government policy making, and through the Australian Government Solicitor, we provide legal services to the Commonwealth, including legal advice and representation.

 

If this sounds like you, apply for our 2021 Graduate Program today.

 

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Past Attorney-General's Department Graduate Hiring Statistics

If you’re interested in working at Attorney-General's Department, understanding when they have opened up applications for their graduate programs, graduate jobs and internships is helpful knowledge to have so you know when you might need to apply. Use the below information to see when Attorney-General's Department hires graduates, but more importantly what graduate degree’s and other student attributes they target for their jobs.


Months

Nov 19Dec 19Jan 20Feb 20Mar 20Apr 20May 20Jun 20Jul 20Aug 20Sep 20Oct 2000.751.52.2530 job0 job0 job0 job0 job3 jobs0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job
  • count

Job types

  • Graduate Jobs (100%),

Disciplines

  • Arts and Humanities (100%),

  • Business and Commerce (100%),

  • Economics (100%),

  • Government (100%),

  • Law (100%),

Locations

  • Canberra (100%),

Work rights

  • Australian Citizen (100%),

Past Attorney-General's Department Graduate Programs

Check out some of Attorney-General's Department's past jobs they have posted on GradConnection over the last 12 months. Understanding the details about what a graduate employer is looking for well before applications have opened can sometimes be the edge you need to secure your first graduate program.


2021 Attorney-General's Department Graduate Program

Job type:

Graduate Jobs

Disciplines:

Arts and Humanities, Business

...

Locations:

Canberra

Workrights:

Australian Citizen

2021 Attorney-General's Department- Affirmative Measures Disability

Job type:

Graduate Jobs

Disciplines:

Arts and Humanities, Business

...

Locations:

Canberra

Workrights:

Australian Citizen

2021 Attorney-General's Department - Affirmative Measures Indigenous

Job type:

Graduate Jobs

Disciplines:

Arts and Humanities, Business

...

Locations:

Canberra

Workrights:

Australian Citizen

About Us - What we do

Attorney-General's Department


Are you part of future Australian Government policy making and program delivery? Can you see yourself working alongside Australia's most intellectual minds, advising on significant national and international matters?

The Attorney-General's Department delivers programs and policies to maintain and improve Australia's law and justice framework, and to facilitate jobs growth through policies that promote fair, productive, flexible and safe workplaces. Through the Australian Government Solicitor, we also provide legal services to the Commonwealth, including legal advice and representation. We are the central policy and coordinating element of the Attorney-General’s Portfolio.

We are structured into five groups:

  • Australian Government Solicitor
  • Enabling Services
  • Industrial Relations 
  • Integrity and International
  • Legal Services and Families

We are proud to be ranked as one of Australia's top graduate employers for the past seven years.

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2018top2019top 2020top

The aim of the Top Graduate Employers list is to recognise those organisations which provide the most positive experience for their new graduates as determined by the graduates themselves. The list was created from a survey of over 2,500 graduates. The survey is completed anonymously and graduates are asked to rate their employer on around 25 different categories including:

We are also proud to be nominated in the 2020 Australian Financial Review and GradConnection Top 10 Graduate Employers Best Law Graduate Employer.

 
 

AGD Graduate Program

Attorney-General's Department


Our Graduate Program is hands-on. You will interact with real clients and key stakeholders to help achieve the Australian Government's policy, program and legal objectives. You will have exposure to and experience a range of challenging and exciting opportunities to develop your career.

In 12 months, you can:

  • gain diverse experience through a number of rotations
  • explore potential career paths
  • learn from mentors
  • build valuable networks with previous graduates, supervisors and senior leaders
  • contribute to our workplace culture by managing fundraising activities, cultural activities and social events 
  • develop new skills and knowledge through an engaging orientation program and extensive development program
  • access further studies, including the opportunity to complete your practical legal training leading to your admission
  • work on a variety of interesting and important policy issues, program delivery and legal matters, often in unique and precedent-setting work of importance to Australia.

Our flexible work environment allows you to balance your work and personal responsibilities. We promote a healthy work-life balance, have generous employment conditions and offer a competitive salary. Our workplace embraces technology to support flexible working arrangements.

On successful completion of the program you will be offered a permanent placement with the department

 
 
 

Policy and Program Stream

Attorney-General's Department


The Attorney-General’s Department 2021 Graduate Program offers you the chance to experience a range of challenging and exciting opportunities to help develop your career in one of our streams:

  • economics
  • industrial relations legal
  • legal practice (Australian Government Solicitor)
  • policy and program
  • policy and program affirmative measures – Indigenous
  • policy and program affirmative measures – disability

If this sounds like you, apply for our 2021 Graduate Program today. Applications close on 17 April 2020.

 

What it’s like to work for us

Attorney-General's Department


Our workforce consists of, and values people from all backgrounds, experiences and culture who respectfully contribute their perspectives to create a thriving environment.


Alyssa Van Groningen

I grew up in Canberra, and studied my Bachelor of Arts (Philosophy and Sociology) at the University of Melbourne. During my undergraduate degree, I worked at a sexual and reproductive health clinic and volunteered at a youth-run gender equality organisation. I moved back to Canberra to complete an Honours year in Philosophy at ANU. I wrote my thesis on the challenges of Indigenous recognition in Australia, with a particular focus on the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

Qualifications

BA (Philosophy and Sociology), with Honours in Philosophy.

Current Rotation (and work involved)

I am currently in the Legal Assistance Branch, which provides the government with policy advice on legal assistance and manages a number of Commonwealth legal assistance programs. At the moment, I am supporting my team with the Serious Overseas Criminal Matters scheme, which helps people in exceptional circumstances – or people facing the death penalty – with the cost of legal proceedings overseas. I have enjoyed gaining insight into the intricacies and complexities of casework. As someone who is passionate about social issues, it has also been rewarding to help facilitate access to justice for vulnerable members of our community.

Previous Rotation/s (and work involved)

My first rotation was in the Native Title Unit where, given the focus of my Honours thesis, I was excited to gain insight into Indigenous policy development. I supported the team to develop a policy response to a landmark High Court decision on native title compensation by undertaking research and contributing to briefings. I also had the opportunity to contribute to a Senate Inquiry process, and facilitated a team discussion on the management of native title monies; a complex issue that presents an increasing challenge in the native title space.

My second rotation was in the International Crime Treaties and Policy Section within the International Cooperation Unit. I assisted in a range of policy reform work during this rotation, including reviewing Australia’s death penalty policy. However, I spent most of my time helping to manage an overseas development aid project in the Indo-Pacific, where my main contribution was revamping the monitoring and evaluation framework used to assess the effectiveness of capacity-building projects. I enjoyed this work because it felt tangible, and because it required extensive contact with a variety of internal and external stakeholders.

Most exciting contribution to the Department

The ‘Talking Heads’ committee at AGD aims to bring prominent individuals to the department to introduce a fresh and challenging perspective on our work. As part of my contribution to this committee, I arranged for Thomas Mayor to present to the Department during NAIDOC Week. Mr Mayor, who participated in the National Constitutional Convention at Uluru, shared his recollections on the moment of consensus that took place at the Convention and offered a powerful message on the importance of unity. The talk was attended by staff at the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Australian Government Solicitor. It was incredibly fulfilling to have facilitated a discussion at the Department on an issue so close to my heart.


Steven

A day in the life of a grad – Steven

8.00am

Arrive at work. I cycle to work each morning and the 15min travel time cuts down my previous Melbourne commute by a fair bit. While the bike lanes aren’t quite to a Fitzroy standard, they’re not too bad and are improving across the ACT. The main AGD building has excellent end of trip facilities with a towel service thrown in, so fortunately I don’t need to worry about showering or choosing an outfit until I get to work.

8.30am

I get to my desk and read through any new emails, including looking through the daily news clips to see whether the two regulatory schemes that my section takes care of have been mentioned in the media. Given that both of these schemes are topical and high profile, these might have an effect on the section’s work for the day.

I continue drafting a response to some correspondence received a few days earlier from a person who has recently held a senior government position who has requested assistance in understanding their potential obligations under one of our transparency schemes. I take a few phone calls throughout the morning to assist stakeholders to navigate the online registration systems, and break up my morning completing a few discrete research tasks which might form the basis of a briefing where a person may have failed to comply with their reporting obligations.

10.15am

I head next door to get coffee with my grad buddy who completed the program the year before. The café at the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet is the choice option thanks to being the best compromise between cost and quality, although I note that this is a point of substantial controversy. My buddy is always a wealth of knowledge on the grad experience, and is able to lend an ear and provide advice on any issues I’m having at work, as well as how to effectively navigate the graduate program.

11am

I head to one of the many training sessions that are part of the graduate program, this time about Cabinet and Legislative processes. One of the directors in the department takes us through some examples of past legislative projects and funding proposals that he has been involved with, including the recent legislation which places obligations on internet hosting providers to report and remove unacceptable violent content posted online. We learn how to best support the Attorney-General and his office throughout this process to ensure that new legislation and other government priorities best reflect the intentions of Government.

12.30pm

I take lunch out in the sun with some of the other graduates to share weekend plans and chat about our work.

Once a week, rather than eating with the grads, I take my lunch over to DFAT for free German conversation classes, which have vastly improved my German language skills over the past few months.

1.30pm

I spend some of my afternoon finalising the response to the correspondence I had been working on earlier, which involves analysing the enabling legislation and explanatory materials to understand the policy context of how the legislation might work in this particular case. Again, coming to the graduate program as a non-legal Arts graduate has not prevented me from taking on technical legal work with the support of my colleagues, which has the added benefit of helping me to develop these soft skills.

I find out in the early afternoon that the Minister is due to introduce a piece of legislation later in the week for which I wrote part of the second reading speech, so I get permission to take some time out of the office and visit Parliament House to see it introduced.

I get back just before 5pm and start pulling together some points for a meeting brief that my director needs for a meeting with stakeholders early the following week.

5.00pm

I make sure to get out of work on time today to walk over to the National Gallery of Australia and attend a talk on the state of Australian foreign relations with a former senior career diplomat. Employees of AGD can attend events with the Institute of Public Administration Australia (IPAA) for free, so the canapes on offer are all the more delightful.

7.30pm

I cycle home and spend the remaining daylight checking up on the veggie garden that I’ve just set up and make sure that my composting worms are getting on with producing good compost. Over dinner, I watch that day’s Question Time highlights because there is always more time in the day to pay attention to politics


Sean

Sean Dondas

I’m from Perth, and studied a double degree in Economics and Arts at the University of Western Australia, in addition to a Diploma of Business at TAFE and Masters of International Affairs and Security at Murdoch University. During my studies, I worked in hospitality and at a university college, and spent time volunteering at a youth cancer not-for-profit including as a board director. In my studies, I completed a non-profit internship in Beijing, China and a parliamentary internship in WA.

As a graduate, you get the opportunity to participate in a range of interesting activities, from policy training to “friendly” competitions against the SES such as bake offs, ping pong and debating, where I enjoyed being part of the winning debate team with my fellow grads! In my first rotation, I provided relief work in the Minister’s Office, which gave me an insight into how the Department and the Office work together to achieve the Government’s priorities. 2019 was an exciting time to be a graduate as I attended my first budget night at Parliament House, and experienced my first election and subsequent Machinery of Government transfer from the Department of Jobs and Small Business to the Attorney-General’s Department.

In my first rotation, I worked in the Operational Policy and Compliance section in the Office of the Federal Safety Commissioner, Building Industry Branch. In a program-based role, I liaised with building and construction companies and Federal Safety Officers to set up audits. I prepared audit documents, briefings, database entries, report reviews and performed other administrative tasks. I also attended an actual audit as an observer to watch the audit process from a different perspective. This rotation was an excellent opportunity to learn about safety in the building industry. It was especially cool to walk past a construction site, knowing that I helped set up the audit for that site. In my second rotation, I worked in the Framework Policy section in the Work Health and Safety Branch. In a policy-based role, I drafted briefs, ministerial submissions and ministerial correspondence; did media monitoring; prepared reports; analysed stakeholder submissions from an independent review, and performed secretariat tasks in the lead up to meetings with portfolio agencies. This rotation was an excellent opportunity to learn about how the Commonwealth, states and territories, regulators and other agencies play their roles in a constantly evolving WHS space.

In my spare time, I like to stay active so I have done some group dance classes such as hip-hop and ballet. I have been part of several grad social sport teams in netball and AFL. My fellow grads and I have watched international cricket and AFL games at Manuka Oval. Was pleasing to watch the mighty Freo Dockers get up against the Giants. Unfortunately, we missed the GWS Giant’s game where it actually snowed! We have also done picnics overlooking Lake Burley Griffin, lawn bowls, weekend trips to the coast, hikes, barbeques, market shopping and social balls. Best piece of advice for moving to Canberra, sort out your accommodation early as every other graduate moving to Canberra will also be looking for places to live before their program starts.


Abbey

Abbey Seckerson

Where did you grow up?

I was born in England, but have lived in Canberra for the past 10 years. I absolutely love Canberra, and will unashamedly do my best to convert any interstate visitors into “Canberrans.”

What are your qualifications?

I graduated with a Bachelor of Laws with First Class Honours and Bachelor of Arts from the Australian National University in 2018. I also completed the Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice through the graduate program.

What is your current rotation?

The Administrative Law Section. This rotation has given me the opportunity to develop core ‘government skills’ essential for a career in the department and broader public service. I’ve drafted a number of submissions for the Attorney-General, reviewed draft legislation and provided comments on potential administrative law issues, drafted explanatory materials, and developed tailored responses to stakeholder questions.

What was your first rotation?

The Office of Constitutional Law. I was excited to rotate through the office as my honours thesis focused on the implied freedom of political communication and the systems of representative and responsible government established in the Constitution. This rotation provided deep insight into the Commonwealth’s approach to litigation and the preparation process. Notably, I assisted the office’s preparation for Comcare v Banerji [2019] HCA 23 (which examined whether the Australian Public Service (APS) Code of Conduct and APS Values imposed an unjustified burden on the implied freedom of political communication) and Masson v Parsons [2019] HCA 21 (which focused on whether a sperm donor was the legal parent of a child conceived via artificial insemination).

What has been the best part of your rotations?

I enjoyed the opportunity to observe a number of proceedings in the High Court during my rotation in the Office of Constitutional Law. As I had been involved in the preparation process, it was incredibly interesting to observe oral argument unfold and watch the bench engage with the complex issues and nuances that arose. It was also grounding to be involved (even in a small way) in matters of great significance for the parties involved, and broader Australian public.

What has been the best part of the graduate program?

The graduate program offers a great opportunity to meet like-minded people with similar interests and goals. The graduate cohort is a wonderful source of social support, and my mentor, buddy and supervisors have been great sources of insight, guidance and perspective throughout the year.

What other departmental activities are you involved in?

Another advantage of being a graduate is the ability to join the Graduate Fundraising Committee and contribute to the department’s culture and annual fundraising activities. I was part of the ‘Steptember’ sub-committee and greatly enjoyed organising the inaugural ‘Great SES v Grad Bake Off.’ This saw senior staff and graduates engage in friendly competition to raise funds for the Cerebral Palsy Alliance. I also worked with a fellow graduate to organise a ‘You Can’t Ask That’ style panel event focused on mental health. This impactful event saw colleagues respond with honesty and humour to awkward or uncomfortable questions about mental health in the workplace.

Why should people be excited to move to Canberra?

Canberra is a criminally underrated city – by Australians. It has consistently made ‘best places to visit’ lists (Lonely Planet can’t be wrong, right?) and that’s because there is genuinely something for everyone. Love coffee and brunch? The world’s best barista is located in Canberra! Enjoy a cultural experience? The National Gallery, Portrait Gallery and Museum of Australia are constantly bringing some of the world’s most incredible exhibits to the capital. Into history? Head down to the War Memorial or National Library. Passionate about the great outdoors? Namadji National Park and Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve are less than an hour away. Are you a politics nut? Well… Canberra! It’s a city of diverse people, experiences and stories. Also there’s no traffic – I probably should have started with that.


Christine Smalberger

My name is Christine and I’m originally from South Africa and the island of Mauritius, but since then I have lived in Perth, Melbourne and now Canberra! Before starting with AGD, I completed a Master of International Relations, which equipped me with transferrable skills to use for the policy work the department does. So far, I have worked in the Secretary’s Review Team to establish the first whole-of-government legal services panel, followed by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Team, which has a strong focus on legal policy work, and I am currently in the Criminal Law Section working on legislation projects. In addition to my work, I am the Secretary of the department’s Social Club, and a general member of the department’s Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Network. Overall, I have found the department to be a flexible and accommodating workplace filled with friendly people and lots of opportunities to get involved in activities outside of work.

 

How we support you

Attorney-General's Department


At AGD we put our people first. We are committed to maintaining a culture that values, respects and fosters inclusiveness. We recognise that to be a high performing department and to reflect the diversity of the Australians we serve, we need to have a diverse workforce with diverse experiences and points of view. Our people are critical to our success, we work hard to build a culture where everyone feels valued for the differences they bring.

The department provides a great opportunity for graduates to form strong networks through activities including the AGD Social Club, lunchtime sports and employee diversity networks. Our networks are made up of employees who recognise that people from different backgrounds bring different viewpoints, experiences and styles which can add value to the goals and outcomes of the department.

We are proud members and support the following organisations 

 

Affirmative Measures – Indigenous (Policy and Program Stream)

Attorney-General's Department


The Policy and Program Stream (Affirmative Measures – Indigenous) is open to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander persons only.

In addition to the essential requirements of the Policy and Program Stream, you will be need to provide evidence that you are an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person. Suitable evidence may include:

  • letter signed by the Chairperson of an incorporated Indigenous organisation confirming that the applicant is recognised as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person, or
  • confirmation of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent document executed by an Indigenous organisation.

Further information is available on the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies website to assist you.

As a policy and program graduate, you can expect to work on a variety of thought-provoking work, including: 

  • contributing to the development and implementation of legislation, policies or programs
  • undertaking analysis, research and critical thinking
  • collaborating with the private sector, states and territories and international partners to improve employment standards, community safety and national security.
  • managing events including ministerial and council meetings.
  • preparing written briefs, submissions, reports and ministerial correspondence.

You will participate in rotations across the department, working on policy and programs in areas that may include: 

  • civil justice
  • family law and legal assistance
  • criminal justice 
  • law enforcement
  • crime prevention
  • national and protective security 
  • international law
  • human rights
  • native title 
  • constitutional law
  • protective security and integrity
  • Industrial relations programmes 
  • Industrial relations policy

You may also rotate through the department’s corporate areas including human resources, strategy and governance and finance. You may also have the opportunity to experience a rotation in one of our portfolio agencies.

During the graduate program you will participate in development activities including a major project, where you will have an opportunity to present to the department, including our senior executives. You will also contribute to a range of cultural and social activities, including a high profile speaker series and fundraising initiatives. You will receive support from supervisors and access to learning and development activities, including the opportunity to complete further study.

Privacy

We respect and acknowledge your privacy. There is ordinarily no obligation for an employee to share information about their Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status. However, for the purpose of this affirmative measure process, you will be required to confirm that you are an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Australian in order to demonstrate that you meet the eligibility requirements.

Information collected about your racial or ethnic origin is regarded as 'sensitive information' for the purposes of the Privacy Act 1988 and your consent is required for this information to be collected or shared.

 
 
 
 

Affirmative Measures – Disability (Policy and Program Stream)

Attorney-General's Department


The Policy and Program Stream (Affirmative Measures – Disability) is open only to people with disability.

For further information on the definition of disability please refer to the Australian Public Service Commission website.

In addition to the essential requirements of the Policy and Program Stream, you will be need to provide further evidence of disability. This would be a certificate or letter from a registered medical practitioner, or a letter from:

  • a Disability Employment Service or jobactive provider or 
  • a secondary or tertiary institution disability services unit in relation to a recent student.

As a policy and program graduate, you can expect to work on a variety of thought-provoking work, including: 

  • contributing to the development and implementation of legislation, policies or programs
  • undertaking analysis, research and critical thinking
  • collaborating with the private sector, states and territories and international partners to improve employment standards, community safety and national security.
  • managing events including ministerial and council meetings.
  • preparing written briefs, submissions, reports and ministerial correspondence.

You will participate in rotations across the department, working on policy and programs in areas that may include:

  • civil justice
  • family law and legal assistance
  • criminal justice
  • law enforcement
  • crime prevention 
  • national and protective security 
  • international law
  • human rights
  • native title
  • constitutional law
  • protective security and integrity 
  • Industrial relations programmes
  • Industrial relations policy

You may also rotate through the department’s corporate areas including human resources, strategy and governance and finance. You may also have the opportunity to experience a rotation in one of our portfolio agencies.

During the graduate program you will participate in development activities including a major project, where you will have an opportunity to present to the department, including our senior executives. You will also contribute to a range of cultural and social activities, including a high profile speaker series and fundraising initiatives. You will receive support from supervisors and access to learning and development activities, including the opportunity to complete further study.

Graduates from all university disciplines are encouraged to apply.

All policy and program positions are based in Canberra. Financial assistance may be offered where you are relocating from your home state

Privacy

We respect and acknowledge your privacy. For the purpose of this affirmative measure process, you will be required to provide evidence that you meet the eligibility requirements. 

 
 
 

What we’re looking for

Attorney-General's Department


Do you have what we’re looking for? We want graduates who:

  • think critically and are curious 
  • respond positively to change and feedback 
  • build relationships with people
  • find solutions to challenges 
  • use sound judgement 
  • communicate and engage professionally with people

If we offer you position on our program, you will need to:

  • pass an employment screen which includes a police record check
  • get and keep a security clearance at the appropriate security level

Eligibility requirements

Our performance expectations explain what we expect from our people. They encourage consistent performance and help us achieve our goals.

 
 

Indigenous Employee Network

Cultural diversity diversity icon

Attorney-General's Department


We celebrate diversity in all of its forms, to create a productive, vibrant and inclusive environment.

Our Indigenous Reconciliation Action Plan acknowledges and promotes the actions we are committed to closing the gap.

Our Indigenous Employee Network (IEN) provides support to its members and offers consolidated advice to the department on workplace issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff. The IEN partners with other parts of the department to ensure recruitment, retention and career development opportunities are provided to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff within the department.

We recognise and support Indigenous Australians through various annual events including:

  • NAIDOC Week events 
  • Eddie Mabo Day
  • National Reconciliation week,
  • Coming of the Light, 
  • International Day of the Worlds Indigenous People, 
  • National Sorry Day,
  • Close the Gap Day, 
  • The Anniversary of the Apology, and 
  • Australia Day – known to many Indigenous people as Survival day.

The department supports employment opportunities managed by other APS agencies including:

 
 

Celebrating Ability in AGD

Disability programs diversity icon

Attorney-General's Department


We are committed to building a culture that values flexibility and fosters inclusion in the way that we work and all that we do. Our focus is on ensuring all staff have access to inclusive and flexible work practices and that our managers, organisational structures, workplace conditions and systems support our professional and personal circumstances.

The department provides access to initiatives such as: 

  • The Celebrating Ability Network (CAN): A network for employees committed to creating a supportive and inclusive workplace for all. We seek to represent individuals living with or supporting someone living with a disability and to increase the profile of these groups within the department. Our members include employees with a disability, caring responsibilities and allies passionate about helping the department become more disability aware.
  • The Disability and Mental Health Action Plan (DMAP): The plan aims to address barriers that might prevent an employee or a stakeholder with disability or long term medical or mental health condition, from fully participating in our workplace. The plan sets out meaningful actions and measurable targets, focussing on the following key areas:
    • culture of inclusion
    • accessibility (including physical access for external stakeholders)
    • recruitment, retention and development of people with disability
    • reporting and accountability
  • Reasonable adjustments: Modifications can be implemented to enable employees with disability, and carers of people with disability to perform their job and participate fully in the workplace. Reasonable adjustments can be permanent or temporary and can be designed to respond to all forms of disability, including mental health conditions and can be detailed in a Reasonable Adjustment Passport.
  • Training and activities: We aim to create a culture of inclusion through various events, including mental health week. The Graduate Fundraising Committee host a series of events during mental health week for all employees. Training is regularly offered to managers and employees to raise awareness of disability and mental health in the workplace.
 

PRIDE in AGD: LGBTQI+

LGBTI support diversity icon

Attorney-General's Department


Our PRIDE in AGD (Promoting Respect, Inclusion, Diversity and Equality) network was established in 2015. The networks purpose is to increase awareness and understanding of LGBTIQ+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, Queer and related communities) issues, and support the development and implementation of LGBTIQ+ and related workplace diversity initiatives within the department.

PRIDE in AGD creates an inclusive and friendly workplace through social and informative events and providing advice to the wider department.

 

 
 

Equal Opportunity

Equal opportunities programs diversity icon

Attorney-General's Department


We collaborate across our states to support offices to encourage all employees to participate in activities that support equal opportunities.

The Women's Network hosts a range of events to raise awareness and funds for causes that promote the interests of women locally, nationally and internationally, as well as networking events and opportunities (e.g conference attendance) for members of the network.

 

 
 

Economics Stream (Industrial Relations)

Attorney-General's Department


As an economics graduate you can expect to:

  • Examine economic issues relating to the labour market and industrial relations, and provide analysis and advice on topics including wages growth, minimum wages, methods of setting pay, trends in enterprise bargaining, forms of work, productivity, and industrial disputation.
  • Provide briefings to senior leaders and ministers on key trends in economic data.
  • Contribute to the Australian Government’s submission to the Annual Wage Review, the process in which minimum wages are set in Australia.
  • Contribute to industrial relations policy development through the provision of economic and labour market evidence and data.
  • Conduct research and statistical analysis (including econometric modelling) on industrial relations issues in the domestic and international contexts.

As an economics graduate you will also have the opportunity to work across government with one of the three rotations being in the Department of Education, Skills and Employment where you will see first-hand how government departments work in collaboration to deliver better outcomes for the Australia community.

During the graduate program, you will also participate in development activities including a major project, where you will have an opportunity to present to the department, including our senior executives. You will also contribute to a range of cultural and social activities including a high profile speaker series and fundraising initiatives. You will receive support from supervisors and access to learning and development activities.

As an economics graduate you must:

  • be an Australian citizen
  • have completed (or be completing your degree by December 2020) within the past four years (on or after December 2016) with strong academic results (credit average).
  • have a Bachelor degree in economics or related field.
 
 
 
 

Help Centre

Attorney-General's Department


Contacts

If you are experiencing difficulties lodging your application please contact us by email: [email protected] or call 02 6141 6111 (option #2). We are contactable during business hours 8.30am to 5pm (AEST).

Keep up to date with our recruitment process via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

 
 
 

How to Apply

Attorney-General's Department


Applications open at 7:30am AEDT on 12 March 2020.

Applications close at 11:55pm AEST on 17 April 2020.

As part of your application you will need to provide: 

  • a response to the question/s in the application form 
  • a completed application form
  • your current academic trancript

For further information about the application process please review our candidate information guide.

Our selection process involves:

  1. Online application and assessments
  2. Online video Interview
  3. Assessment Centre

Apply now for our 2021 Graduate Program.

If you meet the eligibility requirements for one or more of our streams, please visit our website to apply for the 2021 Graduate Program.

Our selection process:

Selection Process

RecruitAbility

The Attorney-General's Department is committed to supporting the employment and career development of people with disability. For more information on the RecruitAbility scheme, refer to the Australian Public Service Commission's RecruitAbility Applicants Guide. The RecruitAbility scheme does not apply to the affirmative measures disability stream.

 
 
 

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