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Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications Graduate Programs

Provides policy advice, programs and regulation in many areas such as air, land, the arts, maritime transport and much more.

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Past Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications Graduate Hiring Statistics

If you’re interested in working at Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications, understanding when they have opened up applications for their graduate programs, graduate jobs and internships is helpful knowledge to have so you know when you might need to apply. Use the below information to see when Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications hires graduates, but more importantly what graduate degree’s and other student attributes they target for their jobs.


Months

Jun 21Jul 21Aug 21Sep 21Oct 21Nov 21Dec 21Jan 22Feb 22Mar 22Apr 22May 2200.250.50.7510 job0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job1 job0 job1 job
  • count

Job types

  • Graduate Jobs (100%),

Disciplines

  • Accounting (100%),

  • Actuary (100%),

  • Administration (100%),

  • Arts and Humanities (100%),

  • Aviation (100%),

  • ...show more

Locations

  • Canberra (100%),

Work rights

  • Australian Citizen (100%),

Past Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications Graduate Programs

Check out some of Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications's past jobs they have posted on GradConnection over the last 12 months. Understanding the details about what a graduate employer is looking for well before applications have opened can sometimes be the edge you need to secure your first graduate program.


Graduate Jobs

Canberra

Accounting

and 37 others

Hires applicants with degrees in

  • Accounting
  • Actuary
  • Administration
  • Arts and Humanities
  • Aviation
  • Banking and Finance
  • Business and Commerce
  • Communications
  • Compliance
  • Computer Science
  • Consulting
  • Cyber Security
  • Data Science and Analytics
  • Design and User Experience
  • Economics
  • Engineering
  • Engineering Software
  • Fast Moving Consumer Goods
  • Funds Management
  • Government
  • Human Resources
  • Industrial Design
  • Information Systems
  • Information Technology
  • Insurance
  • Journalism
  • Logistics and Supply Chain
  • Management
  • Mathematics
  • Media and Advertising
  • Operations
  • Procurement
  • Project Management
  • Recruitment
  • Research and Development
  • Statistics
  • Telecommunications
  • Transport

If you’re seeking an exciting and rewarding start to your career, improving the lives and opportunities of Australians, we want to hear from you.

Graduate Jobs

Canberra

Accounting

and 37 others

Hires applicants with degrees in

  • Accounting
  • Actuary
  • Administration
  • Arts and Humanities
  • Aviation
  • Banking and Finance
  • Business and Commerce
  • Communications
  • Compliance
  • Computer Science
  • Consulting
  • Cyber Security
  • Data Science and Analytics
  • Design and User Experience
  • Economics
  • Engineering
  • Engineering Software
  • Fast Moving Consumer Goods
  • Funds Management
  • Government
  • Human Resources
  • Industrial Design
  • Information Systems
  • Information Technology
  • Insurance
  • Journalism
  • Logistics and Supply Chain
  • Management
  • Mathematics
  • Media and Advertising
  • Operations
  • Procurement
  • Project Management
  • Recruitment
  • Research and Development
  • Statistics
  • Telecommunications
  • Transport

If you’re seeking an exciting and rewarding start to your career, improving the lives and opportunities of Australians, we want to hear from you.

About Us

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


What it does

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications is at the forefront of the Australian Government's efforts to connect our communities, secure the nation's economic future, improve living standards, provide access to high quality communication services and ensure all Australians can enjoy diverse artistic and cultural experiences.

Best known for

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications delivers diverse projects all over Australia. Starting at the Top End, with the Barkly Regional Deal or the Indigenous Repatriation Program. Heading to sunny Queensland, it might be the work of our City Deals in Townsville or the Inland Rail stretching through Toowoomba. Perhaps the National Water Grid Authority's water infrastructure projects helping farmers or the local Australian Post strikes a connection. Public broadcasting and journalism in the Nation's Capital or travelling on the Melbourne Airport Rail Link. Heading over the Bass Strait to see the National Key Freight Routes or connecting remote communities to the NBN. There is an abundance of diverse and impactful opportunities!

Staff stats: 1,700+

The good bits: Tailored professional training, a highly approachable senior department, a diverse and social workforce, and a chance to work on high-impact, large-scale projects that directly improve Australian living.

The not-so-good bits: Graduates must be willing to relocate to Canberra/Ngunnawal Country.

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications story

The Department's vast portfolio offers exciting opportunities to help advance Australia's infrastructure, transport, regional development, communications and creative industries. The Department offers the unique opportunity to experience a range of exciting work areas, all with one thing in common - improving the lives of everyday Australians.

Get involved planning the transport and telecommunications systems of tomorrow, designing liveable future-facing cities, or preparing for the global digital economy. The Department works to empower our regional communities, promote our thriving arts sector, and protect and celebrate the culture, heritage and languages of First Australians.

Why Join Us?

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


If you have a strong vision for Australia's future and a willingness to identify problems and implement innovative solutions, we encourage you to apply to our highly-regarded Graduate Development Program. You will have the opportunity to contribute to vital work that enriches our communities, empowers our regions and leaves a positive impact for generations to come.

Our graduates are an important part of our workforce, which is why we provide a diverse range of work rotations which could see you:

  • Regulating airports;
  • Helping set the course for Australia’s digital future;
  • Implementing the Smart Cities Plan;
  • Developing policy that protects our cultural heritage;
  • Working on the development of the Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport;
  • Supporting the Arts and cultural sector; 
  • Assist in creating policy that protects artwork and artefacts; 
  • Providing advice on strengthening our national broadcasters;
  • Developing policy for broadband, open data and media; and
  • Working on the development of the Inland Rail.

We recruit a small group of graduates each year. This enables us to provide high quality, tailored support to each incoming graduate. We understand the transition from study to a career can be a challenging one. Many of our graduates relocate from other parts of Australia and, for some, it is also their first experience of living away from home. We work hard to make it as easy as possible and offer a generous travel, accommodation and storage package. We also help you settle into Canberra with plenty of housing, food and recreational recommendations.

The program includes:

  • an 11 month program designed to build your networks and provide access to senior leaders
  • three challenging and diverse work rotations across our high profile portfolio
  • commencement as an APS3 employee (from $62,740 plus 15.4% superannuation)
  • upon successful completion of rotations 1 and 2, advancement to an APS4 (from $69,515 plus 15.4% superannuation)
  • upon successful completion of the program, advancement to an ongoing APS5 (from $77,607 plus 15.4% superannuation)
  • a structured learning and development program to set you up for success which may include a Graduate Certificate in Public Administration or Graduate Certificate in Policy and Data at the University of Canberra. (*subject to change)
  • Access to our internal staff networks and experience coordinating key corporate events including the Department's Social Club and Christmas Party.

Department of Infrastructure

Our Graduate Development Program is designed to build on the skills you have acquired at university and introduce you to working in the Australian Public Service. You will develop professional public sector skills through a combination of work rotations, internal training and formal learning and development. 

It's important to us that as a graduate, you feel supported and welcomed into our department and, if you've just moved to Canberra, that you settle in to your new city with ease. Being part of our graduate cohort gives you an immediate social network and is one of the many benefits of the program.

What We Want From You

We're looking for fresh-thinking, innovative and high-performing graduates to help shape the future of Australia's infrastructure, transport, regional development, communications and creative industries.
We’re looking for graduates from a range of backgrounds and education specialties, and graduates from regional and remote areas.

Graduate Program

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


Applications to apply directly with the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications will be open from Monday 7 March 2022 and close on Friday 29 April 2022.

If you're keen to kickstart your career doing rewarding work that makes a difference, apply now for a spot in our highly-regarded Graduate Development Program.

In 2022, the Department are also a participating agency in the following Graduate opportunities.

Indigenous Graduate Pathway Program

As an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, you will be able to complete one application and be considered for multiple Agencies and Departments across the Australian Public Service (APS).

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications values and draws on the skills, capability and cultural insights Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees bring and are committed to developing an inclusive workforce.

Applications for the Indigenous Graduate Pathway Program are open and close on Sunday 24 April 2022.

Australian Government Graduate Program

The Department are a participating agency in the Generalist, Data, Economics, Digital, and STEM Australian Government Graduate streams. Applying for these streams means you only have to go through the application and selection process once to be considered for a range of Australian Government agencies. Wherever you start your public service career as a graduate, you'll do meaningful work from day one, be asked to contribute, be recognised for your perspective and see the impact you can make in the Australian community we serve.

Graduate Development Program

The Department are looking for fresh-thinking, innovative and high-performing graduates to help shape Australia's infrastructure, transport, regional development, communications and creative industries.

If you have a strong vision for Australia's future and are seeking a career where you can make a real difference in the lives of all Australians, we encourage you to apply to the program. Please see the eligibility section to ensure you are eligible to apply.

If you require reasonable adjustments to be made to the assessment process please note this in your application and we will contact you to discuss.

Application Process

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


Eligibility

To be eligible for our Graduate Development Program you must submit a completed application before the closing date and time, and provide evidence or confirmation of the following:

  • be an Australian citizen by October 2022
  • have completed (at least) an Australian Qualifications Framework Level 7 qualification (a Bachelor Degree), equivalent, or higher equivalent by January 2023
  • have completed the most recent degree no more than 5 years from the date of the application being submitted
  • be able to obtain and maintain a valid Australian Government security clearance once accepted into the program
  • be willing to undergo police, character, health or other checks as required • be willing to relocate to Canberra/Ngunnawal Country.

If you require reasonable adjustments to be made to the assessment process please note this in your application and we will contact you to discuss.

Successful applicants demonstrate they are motivated to explore opportunities and exemplify drive and adaptability. They are responsive and comfortable with change. As a graduate in our program you will thrive on being challenged in a flexible and fast-paced environment. Above all else, you will have a positive attitude and a desire to learn.

Key Dates

Department of Infrastructure

A Day in the Life

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


Alison

Alison

7:00am

I am by no means a morning person so waking up at 7am is the perfect sweet spot for me. My day doesn’t start until I get in my morning stretches and then I’ll listen to the ABC News as I prepare my breakfast and lunch. Around 8.10am I’ll quickly tidy up, change into my work clothes, and head out the door. My morning commute is about 5 minutes as I live in the city.

Department of Infrastructure

8:30am

I am currently completing a placement in the Regional Initiatives Implementation Office (RIIO) which sits in the corporate/enabling section of the Regional Division. Working in a project management office means we are the central coordination point for program governance, implementation, monitoring and reporting for the division.

My team is pretty flexible, and people usually start work anywhere between 8am—9am. I like to start my workday at 8.30am and the first thing I do when I arrive at my desk is check my emails and flag anything that I need to action. I then add these tasks to my task list (which is rearranged regularly according to the priorities of the team) and sort the rest of the emails into their respective folders in Outlook.

Today, I’m continuing a task I was working on yesterday which is researching emerging risks, as defined in the Department’s Risk Management and Policy Framework, in order to assess what risks could impact program delivery in the Regional Division. My findings will assist with the workshop sessions my supervisor is hosting to help program teams identify emerging risks for their Program Status Reports (PSRs).

Department of Infrastructure

9:30am

Time for our daily team meeting! Our meetings are always scheduled for 9.30am on GovTeams as people in my team are still slowly migrating back into the office. Our meetings are a great way for us to share funny stories, catch up with each other and start the morning with some positivity. It also helps us understand what our priorities are for the day and for our director to keep us in the loop on SES and executive updates. I feel incredibly supported by my team every day.

Department of Infrastructure

10:00am

With the team meeting over, my supervisor and I have two back-to-back workshops with the RJIP and BBRF program teams to discuss how emerging risks and how to incorporate risk forecasting into the PSR key milestone reporting section. We also share feedback from the Regional Initiatives Governance Board on areas of the PSRs they would like more detail in. 
RIIO does a lot of stakeholder consultation and management as part of being an “office of best practice” and as someone who hasn’t worked in a project management office before, this rotation certainly provides me with useful skills in project management which will translate well across other work areas.  

12:00pm

I enjoy having virtual lunch catchups with Emily and Ani to see how they are doing (I’d never tell them this in person but I’m so grateful to have met them both through the Infrastructure graduate program).

Department of Infrastructure

12:30pm

My supervisor messages me on Skype to check-in and her support is always much appreciated. I quickly discuss with her the “Lessons Learned” meetings I have scheduled in for the afternoon and iron out a few details on how I will run these meetings. 
The Lessons Learned Register supports the Division in capturing better practices, avoid knowledge silos by enabling the transfer of knowledge in program and project management and also assists our team in developing standards. As part of this process, I am engaging across the division to understand best practices, what could have been done better and challenges people are facing from a program management perspective. Some topics I ended up covering during these sessions included records management, audit trails, reporting, information management and stakeholder management.

Department of Infrastructure

2:00pm

With all my meetings done for the day, I switch to the next task on my to-do list which is updating the process maps. My goal is to ensure the process maps capture the procurement process more accurately across the “planning and establishment”, “assessment and funding decisions” and “funding agreement” phases of program delivery. While working on these, my supervisor helped me understand that there is a fine line between a “process” and a “procedure” and it was important I didn’t end up replicating the procurement procedure as not all program teams needed to follow the procedural guidelines word by word.

Department of Infrastructure

3:00pm

The final task I have scheduled for the day is reviewing past ANAO audits to ensure the division is learning from the audit recommendations and making informed decisions about adopting them. I check in with my director to seek her advice on what the final deliverable will be. We agree on an interim report outlining what the division has done to address the recommendations and a final action plan for consideration by the Regional Initiatives Board outlining how we intend to address any gaps. The next Governance Board meeting is in less than a month and so I move this task up in my list of priorities. 

4:30pm

It’s time to fill in my timesheet and call it a day! I’ll usually go for a jog or a long walk. Today, I’m meeting two of my friends for dinner to celebrate a promotion! After dinner, I unwind by making myself a big pot of tea and watching an episode of Extreme Cheapskates. 


Oliver

Oliver

7:30

The alarm goes off. It’s cold. It’s Canberra cold. It’s greyhounds wearing jackets and booties cold. Thankfully, the grad program is full of domestic expats, so there’s no shortage of friends with which to complain. Just don’t complain to Tasmanians. It’s not that cold.

Despite valiant efforts, I’m not a morning person. Coffee, banana, beanie, tooth brush, bus. The quicker this occurs, the better.

8:30

I get to the office at about 8:30, coffee in hand, from my local, or my aeropress – willpower dependent. Find a quiet spot to meditate – existential resilience dependent.

8:45

The office is quite a lovely space and most mornings start with a round of hellos. People really love grads. We may not be experts in the field, but by golly we’re enthusiastic.

9:00

First order of business is taking stock. Emails. Every morning there is a round-up email of all the latest Department-related news stories from across the media platforms. I usually scan for stories related to my branch: the Online Safety Branch. Later in the morning a colleague wraps up the news specifically in the online safety space. There are a couple of stories about world leaders discussing the protection of children online at the recent Paris Summit. My section, the reform and research team, keeps up with initiatives from around the world, so I take note.

I also respond to some emails regarding the Department Social Club, which the grads take responsibility for running. As a sports coordinator, there’s a bit of correspondence about the lunchtime social Public Service Football Association. The mighty Infrastructure Aviators are yet to win a game (but we did come out with a very impressive draw). We didn’t play today, but I take every opportunity to shoe-horn an action shot of the Aviators (see below) where I can.

9:30

Time to meet up as a team. Because of the COVID situation, many of my colleagues are working from home, so we meet via skype. We’re currently working on the consultation of a new legislative instrument, designed to support the reporting and proactivity of platforms and services in their response to online harms. My supervisor outlines tasks for the day and we delegate tasks.

9:45

I check the inbox to see some new submissions to the consultation process. Anyone can make comment and it’s our job to take into consideration the views of industry, social organisations and the public in our advice to the Minister. I’m working to compile the recurring themes and summarise industry recommendations. 

10:30

“Who wants coffee?” Well, the caffeine is already bouncing me across the walls but this sounds like a professional development opportunity, right? “Yes, please!” We go to Makeshift café at the ground floor of our building. I catch up with a few of my colleagues. The branch has a lovely culture and the collegiate environment makes the office a really nice place to be in.

10:45

But back to business. I continue to monitor the inbox for new consultation submissions, but my attention turns to an upcoming meeting this afternoon. Our Branch Head is hosting discussions with a major tech platform based out of California. My team prepares the meeting brief. We need to compile some background on the organisation and its representatives. We try and identify the issues they might wish to discuss. We look through the records of previous meetings and consider the current political and legislative context. Together, we put together some talking points and information to support and inform our branch head at the meeting.

12:30

Lunch! In what can only be described as an immense display of willpower, I walk straight past Fekerte’s (excellent) Ethiopian kitchen. Peanut butter sandwich in hand, I’m walking to the grass by Lake Burley Griffin. Often I’ll have lunch with some of the other grads. We’re a very close, collegiate group and it’s always nice to hear stories about other corners of the Department. It’s such a diverse department with so much going on. Arts policy, aviation, regional development, there’s always something to be surprised by.

13:00

Back to the desk. There are a few emails in the inbox. I’ve been assigned a piece of Ministerial Correspondence. When somebody sends a letter, or email to a Minister regarding online safety, it comes through to us for our subject-matter input. I chat with my supervisor about a response. I look through previous correspondence regarding similar questions. I draft a response. This then goes to be cleared by my supervisors and returned to the Minister’s Office. Ms Citizen will then have an answer to their question. What a win for democracy.

14:00

It’s time for our meeting with the major tech platform. Because online safety is such an international space, many of our meetings occur online, often across time zones.  It’s my job to take some notes. The meeting goes well! The platform representatives share their concerns about how the new legislative instrument could be interpreted. They identify challenges in implementation and seek clarity on the finer details – on what these new changes really mean for them. My Branch Head offers her response. While all these people are highly skilled and in important positions, they are all very friendly and committed to having a productive, good-faith conversation.

15:00

Time to debrief. I chat with the team about the salient points of the meeting, before translating my rambling, frantic notes into English. I share and file these notes, so we can record and consider the points raised

16:30

Well how about that. The day has flown and it’s almost time to go. One last email check, a calendar check and some preparation for the following day. A normal day is a good mix of steady, predictable work and ad-hoc tasks that come through the inbox. Where possible we make sure we’re on top of what can be predicted.

17:00

Woohoo! Home time! Well, gym time. I lift the heavy things and start to switch off from the day.

18:00

Time to make some dinner, make tomorrow’s peanut butter sandwich and zonk out for a bit. But not too long! A couple of the grads are off to play social beach volleyball which is conveniently located next to the Old Canberra Inn.

22:00

Never a dull-moment. Except for sometimes. Time for bed.


Baxter

Baxter Norman

7:30am

My alarm wakes up and I begin to get ready for work. I get changed, make some breakfast and pack my bag. Fortunately, nothing is too far away in Canberra and traffic is rarely heavy. I can choose to either drive to the office, which takes about ten minutes, or take a bus which usually takes around fifteen minutes. I then walk from the bus stop over to the office which is another five minutes.

8:45am

I arrive into the office, unpack my belongings and greet the rest of my team. I check any emails I received late yesterday. I then head down to the café and pick up a coffee to keep me going for the rest of the morning.

9:00am

When I am back in the office, I catch up with my supervisor about any ongoing tasks that need to be completed today. I usually check through the recent news regarding any water projects that fall within my work area. I get these updates on Streem, the department’s media monitoring service. This is important because any recent developments in the status of water projects can impact our team’s work. While I try to plan my work priorities at the start of the day, I am aware that these can change significantly depending on the demands of the team.

Department of Infrastructure

9:15am

I get started on my most important task today which is to help to draft a new policy proposal for the Water Grid Fund. The National Water Grid Authority provides advice to the Australian Government on water infrastructure projects and policy. These projects are designed to improve the resilience of Australia’s water storage and support the growth of regional economies. In my Branch, I work with the team to identify water infrastructure initiatives that can be progressed to construction phase. I spend the morning working with the team to assess a new water investment project which is being considered for funding. This requires research on the project’s financial cost, environmental and cultural impacts, and the potential benefits of the project for improving water supply. Understanding and balancing these factors is critical to determining which infrastructure option will have the highest net benefit for regional communities.

12:00pm

I have my weekly catch up with the Infrastructure Framework and Delivery team about the key priorities for the Branch this week. This is a great opportunity to learn about any updates on the projects that the broader team is working on.

12:30pm

Now that the team meeting has finished I go downstairs to pick up some lunch from nearby. I head back up to the office and eat with some of the other grads. I love eating lunch by the kitchen in the Nishi building because it has a fantastic view of Lake Burley Griffin. This is also a nice time to catch up with the cohort.

1:00pm

After lunch, I head back to my desk and get back to work on the proposal. Once it is completed, I send it over to my supervisor to quality check my work. It is great to have the support of an experienced supervisor when undertaking tasks as a graduate because they can help you to address any issues in your work before it reaches a higher level.

3:15pm

I join a meeting with the National Water Grid Authority and the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment where I am taking minutes for the team. The meeting is to discuss the sensitives surrounding the new water infrastructure proposal that we are working on. One aspect about working in the public service that I really enjoy is the opportunity to work collaboratively with other Departments as well as State and Territory counterparts.

3:45pm

Once the meeting is done, I finish writing up the minutes and share them with my supervisor for clearance. Our team has just received some questions on notice from the most recent Senate Estimates. Questions on notice are used by members on Senate committees to request further information about particular issues related to our portfolio. I work with my supervisor to draft some responses for clearance from my Director.

4:30pm

As I reach the end of my working day, I make some time to work on tasks related my responsibilities within the Department’s Social Club. The graduates of the Department are responsible for the management of the Social Club. We help to run happy hours, trivia nights, fundraisers and the Christmas Party. I am a part of the Christmas Party team that liaises with venues, food vendors and AV equipment suppliers to prepare for the highly-anticipated event at the end of the year.

5:00pm

At the end of the day, I pack up my desk, say goodbye to the team and head home. Once I am home, I get ready for social sports which I play in a league with friends from the Graduate cohort. Social sport is a great way to unwind after a busy day at work.

Social Responsibility

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


The culture

The Department values diversity and is committed to creating an inclusive culture where our people feel connected, valued and respected for who they are and what they bring to the workplace. We know a culture of inclusion enhances our work performance and the wellbeing of everyone. In 2019, Diversity Council Australia recognised the Department as an inclusive employer for their diversity measures. We believe that diversity of experience, abilities, perspectives and backgrounds lead to better outcomes.

The Department has several employee-led networks, including Indigenous Staff Network, Pride and Allies Network, Disability and Allies Network, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity Network, Mental Health and Wellbeing Network and Gender Equality Network.

The Department is committed to supporting and engaging with Indigenous staff and communities. This is demonstrated in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment and Retention Strategy 2020-2022 and the upcoming 2022-23 Indigenous Reconciliation Action Plan.

Social contributions

The Department's social contributions are wide and varied within Australian society, supporting more than just roads, trains and planes. The Department creates effective infrastructure for communication systems to connect all Australians, contribute to the development of regional areas, and promote cultural heritage and the arts.

The Department work directly with local, state and federal governments to improve services and governance of seven Australian territories. The Department works to enhance the productivity and liveability of Australia's upcoming urban centres such as Geelong and Townsville through their ambitious City Deals.

The Graduate Development Program gives graduates the tools to directly contribute to developing Australia's future. Graduates also have several opportunities to raise funds for local charity groups through leading the Departments Social Club.

The vibe of the place

We are looking for graduates who aren't afraid to do things differently and create an impact - those who want to make a difference and are bold enough to take the lead.

Graduates will have the opportunity to work in a way that enriches Australian communities, empowers Australian regions and leaves a positive impact for generations to come. Graduates will be offered tailored training, comprehensive and innovative career development opportunities and experience the Department's modern workplace culture.

Perks & Benefits

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


Living in Canberra/Ngunnawal Country

If you're an interstate candidate and are successful in gaining a position on our Graduate Development Program, you can expect to:

  • Relocate to Canberra/Ngunnawal Country - with the personable support from the Department, at our expense and seeking your preferences
  • Receive up to three weeks of temporary accommodation surrounded by the best coffee shops and croissants!
  • Have your belongings moved and temporarily stored for up to three weeks while you find your new home.

Its reputation may precede it, but with a population, in the vicinity of 400,000, Canberra really is much more than just Australia's public service hub and the seat of Australia's Parliament.

Canberra is Australia's largest inland city and is brimming with lifestyle, city services and world-class events and attractions. The shopping is great, nightclubs are stylish and trendy, the café culture is buzzing and its people are friendly.

Canberrans love their sport and have the highest participation rate in Australia-from lawn bowls to water polo and everything in between. Whether you are cheering on Canberra's top rugby league and rugby union teams, watching AFL, cricket or playing golf, bushwalking or cycling around our many bike trails, Canberra has the sports and recreational facilities to suit your needs.

We're also just a few hours' drive from the NSW snowfields, Sydney and the South Coast's legendary beaches. The Canberra region boasts some of the best food and wine experiences Australia has to offer, with more than 10 wineries within a 30km drive.

By capital city standards Canberra is an affordable place to live, with an outstanding education system, excellent health services, shorter commuting times, plenty of fresh air and community living.

Indigenous

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


The department is committed to contributing to improving employment opportunities, experiences and outcomes for Indigenous Australians. We value and draw on the skills, capability and life experiences that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees bring and are committed to developing a talented, versatile, and culturally safe workforce.

To achieve this, we have developed the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment and Retention Strategy and our upcoming Reconciliation Action Plan.

The department participates in three Entry Level Programs to increase employment and retention of Indigenous staff: the Indigenous Apprenticeship Program (IAP), Indigenous Australian Government Development Program (IAGDP), and the Indigenous Graduate Pathway (IGP). These programs create, increase and sustain employment opportunities, provide meaningful career pathways and capability development opportunities and build and sustain a culturally capable and culturally safe workplace.

These align with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment and Retention Strategy and our ambitious and achievable commitment to see a sustainable increase to a 5% target in the representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff in our workforce by December 2022.

Indigenous employees also have access to the Indigenous Leadership Coaching Program, a high level coaching program designed to build on the unique skills of Indigenous staff who are ready to take the next step in their career.

The department has a dedicated Indigenous Staff Network that provides support and networking for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff. The Indigenous Staff Network also works with areas of the department to increase acknowledgement, awareness and understanding of First Nations cultures and peoples, in particular in relation to the work of the department. The network is managed by Co-chairs and is supported by the department's Indigenous Champion.

The department seeks to build cultural awareness and understanding through recognising National Reconciliation Week and celebrating the diversity of First Nations peoples and cultures during NAIDOC week. It is acknowledged that increasing awareness and understanding should not be limited to these two weeks and the department's diversity networks are working together to ensure that diversity is acknowledged year round.

Department of Infrastructure

Disability

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


Through collective and sustained effort, we aim to create a culture that benefits and supports all people with disability.The

Disability and Allies Network (DAN) provides professional and social networking for staff as well as support, learning and advocacy relating to people with disability and carers in the department. The network is managed by a Chair who coordinates activities and supports network members.

The Disability and Allies Network (DAN) promotes the inclusion of people with disability and carers of people with disability in the department.

To date, the Network has:

  • Established the Disability and Carers Steering Committee.
  • Commissioned a review of accessibility at all five departmental sites by Design for Dignity Pty Ltd.
  • Promoted events including SIP Week, International Wheelchair Day, World Autism Awareness Day and National Amputee Awareness Week.
  • Co-hosted a panel event with the GEN Network on Carers which also launched the Carers' Action Plan.
  • Funded two Network members to attend Meeting Place in Alice Springs, the national disability arts conference run by Arts Access Australia.
  • Provided support and advice to staff members with disability, managers of people with disability, and line areas who are working with the disability community.

The APS Disability Employment Strategy 2020-25: From Intention to Action was launched on 3 December 2020 and provides a foundation for building an inclusive and diverse Australian Public Service.

The Strategy has two focus areas:

  • Attract, recruit and retain more people with disability
  • Accessible and inclusive workplace cultures and environments

Currently, 4.1% of staff identify as a person with disability with a goal to increase this number to 7% in alignment with the strategy.

There is a strong interrelationship between the elements of this Strategy. First, attraction, recruitment, and retention; and secondly accessible and inclusive workplace cultures. This is important because disability can affect anyone, at any age, and at any stage of the employment cycle.

The department are members of the Australian Network on Disability.

Department of Infrastructure

Gender Equality

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


Equality is about recognising differences and providing tools and support so everyone has an opportunity to succeed. The department aims for consistent gender balance throughout the department and does so through removing barriers to work participation and career progression.

The Gender Equality Network (GEN) provides professional and social networking for staff as well as support, learning and advocacy relating to gender equality in the department. The network is managed by Co-Chairs who coordinate activities and support network members.

The network also provides a mentoring program open to all employees of the department.

Department of Infrastructure

LGBTQIA+

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development & Communications


The department is dedicated to our goal of increasing the number of LGBTQIA+ identifying staff, through measures such as the Australian Workplace Equality Index survey. We are committed to supporting a safe environment, where LGBTQIA+ staff feel supported, confident and happy to share their identity.

The department has a dedicated Pride and Allies Network led by Co-chairs. The department is a member of Pride in Diversity, a program that assists employers with all aspects of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex and Asexual (LGBTQIA+) inclusion.

Pride in Diversity offer a range of:

  • resources
  • networking opportunities
  • training
  • consulting
  • advice

Department of Infrastructure

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