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ASIO Graduate Programs

About Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO)

GOVERNMENT & PUBLIC SERVICE

What it does: Australia’s national security service.

Staff stats: Around 2000 employees, mainly based in Canberra, but ASIO also has offices across Australia.

The good bits: Serving your country. ASIO staff help protect Australia and Australians from threats to their security. 

The not so good bits: You can’t vent about a bad day at work. The identity of ASIO officers and the work they do is secret, so you can’t tell people what you do or who you work for. 

Hiring grads with degrees in:  Health & Medical Sciences; Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences; Law & Legal Studies; Property & Built Environment; Sciences; Engineering, Maths, IT & Computer Sciences; Finance, Accounting, Communications, Economics & Business Administration

ASIO currently has 0 opportunities.
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Past ASIO Graduate Hiring Statistics

If you’re interested in working at ASIO, understanding when they have opened up applications for their graduate programs, graduate jobs and internships is helpful knowledge to have so you know when you might need to apply. Use the below information to see when ASIO hires graduates, but more importantly what graduate degree’s and other student attributes they target for their jobs.


Months

Oct 20Nov 20Dec 20Jan 21Feb 21Mar 21Apr 21May 21Jun 21Jul 21Aug 21Sep 2100.250.50.7510 job0 job0 job0 job0 job1 job1 job0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job
  • count

Job types

  • Graduate Jobs (100%),

Disciplines

  • Accounting (50%),

  • Administration (50%),

  • Agriculture (50%),

  • Architecture (50%),

  • Actuary (50%),

  • ...show more

Locations

  • Canberra (100%),

Work rights

  • Australian Citizen (100%),

Past ASIO Graduate Programs

Check out some of ASIO's past jobs they have posted on GradConnection over the last 12 months. Understanding the details about what a graduate employer is looking for well before applications have opened can sometimes be the edge you need to secure your first graduate program.


ASIO

Closed 5 months ago

Are you seeking a career with an Intelligence Agency where you can contribute and make a difference to the security of Australia?

JOB TYPE

Graduate Jobs

LOCATION

Canberra

SALARY

$83,936-$90,107

ASIO

Closed 6 months ago

Are you seeking a career with an Intelligence Agency where you can contribute and make a difference to the security of Australia?

JOB TYPE

Graduate Jobs

LOCATION

Canberra

About Us

ASIO


The ASIO story

After WWII, Soviet spies were discovered accessing confidential government data from both the UK and Australia. In 1949, this prompted the Prime Minister to issue a ‘Directive for the Establishment and Maintenance of a Security Service’, which set in motion the creation of ASIO.

ASIO has worked to protect Australia and Australians for over 70 years. While many things have changed in this time, ASIO’s purpose has remained constant. As Australia’s national security service, much like its foreign counterparts such as Britain’s MI5, it's tasked with collecting and assessing security intelligence, investigating and responding to threats to national security. During the Cold War, this largely consisted of keeping an eye on Soviet interference. More recently it has been involved in everything from preventing terrorist attacks to catching spies. 

ASIO protects the nation from foreign interference, espionage, sabotage, terrorism and threats to Australia’s border integrity. When investigating threats to Australia’s security, the ASIO Act 1979 allows officers to do certain things which would otherwise be unlawful. Use of these special powers is strictly limited by legislation, and ASIO operates within the letter and the spirit of the law. The Director-General of Security leads ASIO, which is a statutory agency in the Home Affairs portfolio.

The culture

ASIO counters threats through the dedication of its staff—ordinary people who do extraordinary things—and strong partnerships with law enforcement and national security agencies, governments, industry, academia and international counterparts.

ASIO is committed to diversity and inclusion. Seeking to reflect the community it protects, ASIO recognises the value of diverse thinking. It actively encourages women in Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths (STEM) and those from diverse backgrounds to apply. ASIO has been awarded silver accreditation by the Australian Workplace Equality Index.

However, there is a rigorous selection process to work at ASIO. While your application information is strictly confidential, people not comfortable providing detailed personal information might wish to consider if ASIO is right for them.

Social contribution

ASIO helps keep Australians safe, often in the background with little public recognition of the work its team does to protect the nation. ASIO staff are extremely dedicated to their work, but that doesn’t mean it’s all they do. ASIO’s people are from all walks of life, and their passions outside of the workplace reflect this.

Why Join Us?

ASIO


Remuneration

You’ll earn $80,797 while doing the Technologist graduate program, with a pay bump to $83,936 once you’ve completed it.
For the Intelligence Professionals program, you will earn between $83,936 and $90,107 plus 15.4% superannuation. On successful completion of the program you will be promoted and the salary range will increase to between $92,773 and $104,533 plus 15.4% superannuation.

Career prospects

Both graduates and mid-career professionals will have opportunities for professional development through graduate-entry and leading intelligence and management training programs within ASIO’s career management frameworks.

You can select from, and move between, a variety of jobs in ASIO, always growing and developing new skills during your career in security intelligence.

As with most public service roles, you’ll need to develop your capabilities to be competitive when looking for promotion to the next level.

The vibe of the place

ASIO is a unique workplace with an important purpose. Its success is built on the imagination and intelligence of its team, staff who are committed to deliver on its national security mission.

The Organisation will work with you and support you through the good times, as well as the more challenging times. The environment is busy and the work can be stressful, but ASIO officers take care of each other and the Organisation provides a number of support services for our all staff.

Technologist Graduate Program

ASIO


The Technologist Graduate Program (TGP) is a 12-month program (comprising three workplace rotations) designed to expose you to the broad technology spectrum within ASIO. By being embedded in operational and/or enterprise teams you will directly contribute to ASIO’s mission of protecting Australia and Australians from threats to their security. You’ll also receive tailored learning and development from internal experts, industry, academia and international partners, and ongoing support from line managers, peers, mentors and graduate coordinators.

You’ll be part of an environment that fosters innovation and creativity. We seek to reflect the diversity of the community we protect, and recognise the value of diverse thinking. We work as a team to out-think and out-imagine our adversaries. Upon completion of the Graduate Program you’ll transition into a team that will continue to develop your skills and your aspirations.

The Technologist Graduate Program is looking for people who have studied STEM and ICT subjects such as Cyber Security, Computer Forensics, Mathematics, Data Science/Analytics, Network Engineering, Software Engineering/Development, Telecommunications, Electrical, Mechanical, Computer Engineering, Information Security and ICT Systems Integration and Management.

This program builds on your existing skills to prepare you to be an ASIO Technologist, which involves using or developing technology to gather and analyse intelligence. This can include telecommunications interception, computer exploitation, technical surveillance, data science and electronic or software engineering.

Intelligence Officer or Analyst

ASIO


ASIO Intelligence Professionals collect and analyse information to provide advice to senior management and government on matters of national security.

This is an opportunity to take on a role with great purpose – protecting Australia and Australians from threats to their security – at one of Australia’s most trusted and awarded workplaces. It’s perfect for well-rounded individuals with strong written and verbal communications skills who are looking for a challenge. The Intelligence Professional stream includes two varied roles for you to consider.

As an Intelligence Professional trainee, you will undertake 12 months of training which will consist of classroom and work-based (practical) training. During this period you will see first-hand what it’s like to work as an Intelligence Professional and enjoy on-the-job development alongside ASIO colleagues. During the Intelligence Development Program (IDP), Intelligence Professionals will earn between $83,936 and $90,107 plus 15.4% superannuation. On successful completion of the program you will be promoted and the salary range will increase to between $92,773 and $104,533 plus 15.4% superannuation.

Intelligence Officer

Intelligence Officers have a breadth of career opportunities within ASIO in both analytical and human intelligence collection roles. Intelligence Officers are involved in the collection of human intelligence which includes meeting with members of different communities to mitigate security threats, while building ongoing confidential relationships with people to assist ASIO in achieving our security intelligence mission. Intelligence Officers are also trained as Intelligence Analysts.

In addition to the eligibility requirements listed below, you must be willing to be mobile throughout your career as an Intelligence Officer. This means potentially relocating to an Australian capital city every three to five years.

**Some roles may require an Australian driver’s licence (Class C)**

Intelligence Analyst

Intelligence Analysts will be posted to a broad range of analytical roles within ASIO throughout their careers. You will identify and investigate patterns and anomalies, draw intelligence value from large volumes of information, solve complex problems and produce high-quality advice for government. You will drive ASIO investigations, undertake research, make assessments and develop in-depth knowledge of specific issues. Intelligence Analysts apply best-practice analytical skills with subject matter expertise to make decisions on critical issues relevant to national security—often in high-tempo environments. Intelligence Analysts have the opportunity to work in a range of analyst roles which are primarily based within our Canberra headquarters.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the Intelligence Professional roles, you must:

  • have completed formal tertiary qualifications before December 2021; and/or
  • be able to demonstrate work/life experience relating to the job specific capabilities listed below.

Job specific capabilities:

  • provide impartial advice;
  • gather, research and analyse information to prepare written and oral briefings;
  • apply exceptional judgement;
  • apply critical thinking and logical reasoning;
  • operate independently and in teams;
  • demonstrate personal and professional resilience; and
  • demonstrate high level interpersonal and verbal communication skills.

We value life and practical skills and experience as highly as formal qualifications.

In addition to the above you must:

  • be an Australian citizen;
  • be willing to relocate to Canberra for the 12 month training period (removalist costs are met by ASIO); and
  • be assessed as suitable to hold and maintain a Positive Vetting security clearance.

Other Opportunities

ASIO


As well as the above roles, ASIO recruits psychologists, lawyers and linguists, as well as corporate staff in areas such as IT, HR, communications and finance. If you are looking for a start to your career in these areas, ASIO handles all of these functions in house so keep your eye on their website for opportunities.

Application Process

ASIO


To apply, you’ll need to be an Australian citizen. You will undergo a long and demanding assessment process. This will include an extensive background check to determine whether you are eligible for a ‘Positive Vetting’ security clearance. As part of the security clearance process, you may be drug tested, have your digital footprint checked out and be required to supply information about your current and past financial situation.

Obviously, you’ll also need to be discreet – ASIO doesn’t even like people revealing they’ve applied to work there. ASIO doesn’t supply much information about the stages of the recruitment process. As with other public service graduate programs, you should be prepared for a long process, which starts with an online application.

Employee Profiles

ASIO


Alice

Lawyer at ASIO

Don’t pigeon hole yourself into a particular practice area of law. There are so many options as a lawyer, so keep an open-mind and challenge yourself.

Where did you grow up?

I have lived all around different parts of New South Wales, but, predominantly grew up in South-West Sydney. After I completed a Bachelor of Laws/Arts at the University of Western Sydney I moved to Canberra where I was fortunate enough to be accepted into ASIO Corporate Graduate Program.

How did you get your current job?

I applied for the ASIO Corporate Graduate Program in my final year of university. During the year-long program, I worked in different areas within ASIO’s Legal Services area and was exposed to so many interesting matters that spread across the work of the Organisation. 

How did you choose your specialisation?

I chose to apply for the Corporate Graduate Program as I enjoyed by legal studies at university and I wanted to pursue a legal career. The Program offered me the opportunity to work in an interesting area of law whilst completing my Graduate Legal Practicing Certificate to become a qualified lawyer. I’ve been in my permanent role for a year now, and looking back, I’m certainly glad I made the decision to come to ASIO.  

What was your interview process like?

The recruitment process can be lengthy, particularly the process of obtaining a security clearance—although all graduate recruitment processes tend to take some time anyway. The process was what I expected: the initial application, assessments, some interviews (including a security and a psych interview) and, of course, paperwork. The people I dealt with during the process were always professional and helpful. There was nothing unusual and no hidden tests (at least none I’m aware of), it just required a bit of patience and persistence.  

What does your employer do?

ASIO protects Australia, its people and its interests from threats to security through intelligence collection and assessment, and the provision of advice to the Australian Government. ASIO’s legal team are here to enable ASIO to do this lawfully, within Australia’s legal framework.

What are your areas of responsibility?

As a legal officer, my role is to deliver trusted, accurate, timely and practical legal advice and services to ASIO. This includes providing support to legislative reform relating to operational activities to enable ASIO’s mission. 

Can you describe a typical workday?

My workday will vary depending on what is going on. Probably similar to other legal roles, on a typical day, I may attend meetings, conduct legal research, draft legal advice and work on legislative reform. There’s always something to do, so it’s definitely a job for someone who enjoys a fast-paced work environment. The last thing I worked on was providing legal advice to support ASIO operational activity. While I can’t divulge what it was about, I can say it’s really cool to be involved in what ASIO does on the ground and to see your work contributing to the end goal.

What are the career prospects with your job?

Completing the Corporate Graduate Program as a legal graduate does not necessarily mean you are pigeon-holed into a legal career in ASIO forever. There are a number of opportunities for advancement within Legal Services, but also opportunities to move to other areas within ASIO or even more broadly within the National Intelligence Community. I believe the Corporate Graduate Program provided me with a great foundation for wherever I decide to go with my career in the future. 

What would your career be if you weren’t doing what you’re doing now?

Had I not chosen to come to ASIO, I would likely have pursued a career in private practice or in consulting. I imagine my life would be VERY different had that been the case. While I’m sure there are pros and cons, either way, I’m definitely glad this is the career path I chose. 

Pros and Cons

What do you love the most about your job?

As an ASIO lawyer, I love being able to see how my day to day work as a lawyer directly impacts and contributes to ASIO’s overall mission.  No two days are the same, so for me, I enjoy the variety and the challenge the job provides. At the same time, I am fortunate to work for an employer who offers flexible working hours.

What’s the biggest limitation of your job?

Because you are working in the national security space, sometimes being an ASIO lawyer can be quite challenging, as this adds another dimension to navigating legal issues, but it is also very rewarding as you can see the direct impact your work has on the Organisation.  It can be difficult at times because you are not allowed to talk about the work you do or even that you work at ASIO; on the other hand, the plus side of this is that you don’t bring the work home with you!

Which three pieces of advice would you give to a current university student? 

  1. Don’t pigeon hole yourself into a particular practice area of law.  There are so many options as a lawyer, so keep an open-mind and challenge yourself. I did not picture myself as a Government lawyer for an Intelligence agency, but, I’m so thankful for the opportunity as it has turned out to be a great experience and the start of hopefully a long and happy career.
  2. If given the opportunity - get involved in extra-curricular activities, it not only gives you a competitive edge in a recruitment round, but, you gain valuable experience!
  3. If you are looking to practice as lawyer, consider a career with ASIO.  The work is diverse, interesting, challenging and unlike any other job.

Maria

Forensic specialist at ASIO

There are a lot of career opportunities at ASIO. The organisation provides opportunities for people to move around to new areas, try new roles and find their work-life balance.

What are your full name and job title?

Maria – a forensic specialist.

What did you study?

I graduated with a Bachelor of Information Technology in 2017.

Where did you grow up? Have you held any previous employment?

When I was young my parents travelled a lot for work, so I spent a great deal of time in Asia. I had a lot of unique experiences growing up overseas and made friends in many different places. Once I reached high school we moved to Canberra and I’ve been here ever since. While studying both at school and university, I worked part-time in customer service roles. Surviving in retail and working in fast food set me up well for interviews, particularly questions related to dealing with stressful situations!

How did you get to your current job position?

With university graduation looming before me, I realised I needed to figure out what I wanted to do with myself. As a result, I applied to every IT-based graduate program I could find, one of which was ASIO’s Technologist Graduate Program. Before stumbling across the application it had never occurred to me that ASIO would even have a requirement for IT specialists, but once I started the process it quickly became my first preference. Luckily I was successful and spent my first year in the organisation moving between different technical teams, learning what they do, playing with some cool toys and figuring out what kind of work I wanted to do permanently. At the end of the graduate year I got placed in my current position as a forensic specialist.

How did you choose your specialisation? Were you weighing up any other alternatives before choosing this specialisation?

IT was something I started on a whim in high school because I played computer games and used a computer all the time. Once I started learning to program it clicked quickly and I loved it. When university decisions came up I knew that I wanted to keep being able to program, but I was also considering an animation oriented course. In the end that fell through and I commenced a Bachelor of IT, which was the best thing that could have happened. Studying IT at university exposed me to a diverse specialisation and allowed me to try a bunch of different aspects of IT in order to figure out what I enjoyed most. Once I graduated I did consider looking at jobs that were not IT-specific, but my love of solving problems was too strong!

What was your interview process like? What kind of questions were you asked?

I applied to a number of other graduate programs and the kinds of interview questions were pretty similar across all interviews. Most of the positions I applied for involved an assessment centre, a full day of activities and an interview. The activities ranged from group activities to individual writing tasks, to more specific skill-set tests. Don’t fret though; mostly these are used to see how you work with others and under pressure. For one application I entirely misunderstood an entire activity and definitely got it wrong, but they still offered me a job!

The interview part included questions such as ‘Can you give an example of when you had to deal with a difficult customer?’ Any previous work experience really helps with these kinds of questions, however, group work at university gives you enough experience to have an example or two up your sleeve. There were also IT-specific questions, but they tended to revolve more around the aspects of IT I had experience with and examples of projects I’d done, rather than specific technical questions.

What does your employer do?

ASIO’s purpose is to protect Australia, its people and its interests from threats to security through the collection and assessment of intelligence – this means the work you do will truly make a difference. We need people with a wide range of skill sets and experiences to accomplish this goal.

What are your areas of responsibility?

My team undertakes forensics and intelligence gathering activities in support of operations (these activities are allowed under the ASIO Act). It can be pretty exciting when you are out in the field working on a deadline and solving unexpected scenarios as they come up – every day is different. Along with this, we also develop tools and capabilities to help us complete our work more efficiently. This means I get to play with a lot of cool ‘toys’ and have to keep up with new and evolving technologies in a complex and constantly changing field.

Can you describe a typical workday? What was the last thing you worked on?

As I’ve just started in this team I’m still learning! My days usually consist of a lot of research and training exercises, where I get to practice the skills that I need to complete forensic work. In addition, I have been given tasks that are relevant to my skill set and are somewhat familiar. For example, I am currently building a computer to assist with data processing.

What are the career prospects with your job? Where could you or others in your position go from here?

There are a lot of career opportunities at ASIO. The organisation provides opportunities for people to move around to new areas, try new roles and find their work-life balance. The Technologists Graduate Program is a great example of this: I have already worked in three different roles across a variety of technical areas. For me personally, I have multiple roles that I could work in across corporate IT and in our technical operations areas. Training and mentoring programs, along with on the job learning and development opportunities will help me to develop and refine my leadership skills for when I decide to apply for promotional (or other) opportunities.

What would your career be you weren’t doing what you’re doing now?

Honestly, I’m not sure. I spent a little bit of time working in private industry so I might have kept that job – but the role was more governance-based. I imagine I would still be working in IT to solve problems.

What do you love most about your job? What kind of task do you enjoy the most?

I chose IT because I loved the problem-solving aspect of it and my job definitely allows me to continue to do that. There is nothing more satisfying than coming across an unexpected problem or a missing capability and being able to fill that requirement. Additionally, I love knowing that the work I am doing is directly helping to keep Australian’s safe. There is a lot of job satisfaction from that.

What’s the biggest limitation of your job? Do you bear a lot of responsibility? Do you have to work on weekends? Are stress levels high?

Working for the ASIO has a lot of unique limitations, given the environment we work in. For example, only a handful of people know where I work. Given the work we do and the oversight mechanisms ASIO is bound by, there is a certain level of responsibility that comes with that. Line managers and colleagues are supportive and the organisation ensures we have the relevant training to do our jobs, which certainly assists in feeling supported.

My role does require some after-hours work, but I am either compensated for the additional hours I work, or I get time off in lieu. The people who work at ASIO are a lot like a family and everyone is looking out for one another. Even when things get difficult you won’t be alone in overcoming them.

Which three pieces of advice would you give to a current university student?

  • Don’t worry about not knowing how to do a job before you get it. You go to university to learn how to learn and get foundational knowledge that will be helpful in the workplace. No one expects you to know how to do the job on your first day. As long as you are enthusiastic and willing to learn, you will pick up the skills you need to succeed.
  • Follow your passions. Even if people tell you that one career path might be more lucrative than another, it won’t do you any good if you are not passionate about it. You’ll do better at work that you enjoy and want to excel at, and likely end up happier as a result too.
  • Take opportunities for job experience in your field if you can. I know that when I started my first part-time IT job it was fascinating to see the difference between learning skills and actually practising them in a work environment. It can also help you determine the elements you enjoy in the workplace.

Sarah

Legal graduate, ASIO

I enjoy working on tasks that have a direct impact on ASIO and ASIO’s ability to carry out its functions.

What is your name and job title?

Sarah – Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) legal graduate.

What did you study? When did you graduate?

A Bachelor of Laws. I graduated in 2016.

How did you get to your current job position?

I applied as part of an internal recruitment round and have been in the role since June 2018.

How did you choose your specialisation? Were you weighing up any other alternatives before choosing this specialisation?

The Graduate Program exposes you to a number of different legal areas within the organisation, but I have not chosen a specialisation yet.

What was your interview process like?

It was a competitive recruitment process.

What does your employer do?

ASIO protects Australia, its people and its interests from threats to security through intelligence collection and assessment, and the provision of advice to the Australian Government.

What are your areas of responsibility?

Providing in-house legal advice.

Can you describe a typical work day? What was the last thing you worked on?

The great thing about the Graduate Legal Program is the variety of work that you are exposed to. However, similar to other legal positions, on a typical day you might attend meetings, conduct legal research, provide advice and work on legislative reform.

What are the career prospects with your job? Where could you or others in your position go from here?

There are a number of opportunities for advancement within the Legal division and more broadly within ASIO. I believe the skills I have developed through the program will give me a competitive advantage in progressing my career.

Could someone with a different background do your job?

Absolutely. ASIO values diversity and welcomes people from all backgrounds.

What do you love most about your job?

The variety and challenging nature of the work. I enjoy working on tasks that have a direct impact on ASIO and ASIO’s ability to carry out its functions.

What’s the biggest limitation of your job?

Working in the national security environment, I am unable to discuss the details of where I work and what I am working on.

Do you bear a lot of responsibility? Do you have to work on weekends?

Given the complex nature of the work at ASIO there is a higher degree of responsibility, however, there is good support from supervisors and colleagues. Generally I am not expected to work on weekends.

What advice would you give to a current university student?

I would tell a current university student that if they are looking for a challenging, interesting and rewarding career, then they should consider a job with ASIO.


Tom

ASIO Technologist Graduate

Each piece of work you undertake contributes to ASIO’s mission and has the power to make a real difference in protecting Australians.

What's your job about?

As an ASIO Technologists graduate I’ve spent the last year rotating through various tech teams in ASIO (before my permanent placement in data analytics commences). During the past year, I’ve worked on projects that provide in-depth tactical analysis to ASIO’s investigations; I’ve undertaken a forensic analysis of digital media; I’ve been exposed to our telecommunications interception capability (which the legislation provides for us to do); and I’ve been getting hands-on with cutting edge AV gear, in advance of it being deployed operationally.

What's your background?

I grew up living in Melbourne where I always enjoyed school and all that which came with it – whether it be studying or learning, or friendships and sport. It has always been important to me to maintain a good balance of curricular and extra-curricular activities.

I went on to study aerospace engineering, majoring in mathematical statistics, before completing an honours project. I also worked in hospitality all throughout university. Here I started washing dishes in the kitchen before working my way up through some more enjoyable roles.

I applied for the ASIO Technologist Graduate program after seeing it advertised on the ASIO website. At first, I wasn’t sure that my technical skillset would be applicable, but after talking to someone from the Organisation they assured me there are a number of positions which can really use my skills. I applied for the graduate position in February 2019 and started in early February 2020. The process takes longer than other graduate programs as there is a need to go through positive vetting for top-secret clearance. We were told that the wait was necessary but worth it – and now I am in, I can say they were 100% right. It’s even better than I expected and the opportunities are amazing.

Could someone with a different background do your job?

Yes! Those taken into the ASIO Technologists Graduate program come from a really wide range of technical backgrounds and education. In my intake, we have electricians, software developers, computer science grads, network engineers and mathematicians just to name a few. If you have a tech background, the chances are that ASIO will be able to use it.

If I boiled it all down, the qualities we all share are probably a passion for technology and a commitment to generating solutions from it that will contribute to the bigger picture.

What's the coolest thing about your job?

Even as a technical graduate you are responsible for meaningful work and projects. Each piece of work you undertake contributes to ASIO’s mission and has the power to make a real difference in protecting Australians. The Technologist Graduate program also provides amazing opportunities to do lots of different things and, being a tech-head, the gear you get to play with is pretty cool too!

What are the limitations of your job?

Working in a security and intelligence environment means the workload can be rapidly influenced by external developments for which swift response times are sometimes needed and for which we sometimes work (but get paid for) some pretty odd hours. Also, the need for discretion when talking about your job is a bit weird at first, but it doesn’t take long to adapt to.

Pieces of advice for yourself when you were a student...

  1. Take the initiative and you’ll find there are opportunities you weren’t even aware of.
  2. Have fun and try to enjoy all that you’re doing. Positive mental application will mean hard work can deliver even better results.
  3. The deep end inspires confidence; don’t be afraid to jump in.

Priya

Information Technology Security Advisor

Good grades do not necessarily equate to good subject knowledge; of the two, make sure you have the latter (because that’s what employers care about!)

Where did you grow up?

I was born and raised in rural Australia and graduated from high school in 2015. Like most kids from the outback, there was not a lot of opportunities to pursue my career interest (in my case – Information Technology) in my home town beyond high school. With some help from my teachers, I was lucky enough to get into the Bachelor of IT program at CSU.

How did you get your current job?

I came into ASIO via the Technologist Graduate Program. Within the Program, I rotated through three teams over twelve months. One of my rotations was within ASIO’s IT Security team - it was such a good fit that I ended up re-entering the team once the Program was completed.

How did you choose your specialisation (compared to others)? / Were you weighing up any other alternatives before choosing this specialisation?

I always had an interest in IT (likely from an early childhood love of video games). However, IT is such a large field and I found my niche in cyber-security. I find it incredibly rewarding to understand how systems can be broken, breaking them, and fixing them again. In my last year of University, I wanted to find an employer that would allow me to follow my passion for cyber-security, as well as enable me to make a positive difference to society. Many addressed the former criterion (banks,
insurance companies, etc.). However, very few met the latter – until I found an online advertisement for ASIO’s Technologist Graduate Program, it looked like a perfect fit (spoiler alert: it was!), I applied and was lucky enough to be successful. 

What was your interview process like? What kind of questions were you asked?

When applying to ASIO, I undertook several interviews (related to my aptitude, personal background and psychological profile) – each a piece of the puzzle to help determine your ability to hold a high-level security clearance and work in the organisation. I remember being daunted by the sheer number of interviews that I was asked to attend – especially knowing that other employers were typically only asking for one interview! However; each interviewer was pleasant and it never truly felt like an interview – it was always more of a conversation. I was encouraged to be myself and to that end, I was asked a lot of questions about my interests, hobbies, general knowledge (based on my field of study) and the reasons why I wanted to work at ASIO.

What does your employer do?

ASIO’s mission is to protect Australia, its people and its interests from harm. As an intelligence organisation, ASIO achieves this mission through collecting information (through both human and technological sources), analysing it, drawing conclusions from it, and sharing it with the relevant bodies to act upon it, when necessary. No matter whether you are in Human Resources, IT or on the ground performing operational activities, what you do has a direct link back to that mission – and that, I think, makes working at ASIO so fulfilling.

What are your areas of responsibility?

As a member of IT Security within ASIO, I perform a wide variety of activities that fall under the umbrella goal of ‘enabling ASIO through the secure use of technology’. Such activities include: providing advice to operational areas on their utilisation of a variety of technologies to perform technical intelligence collection; performing security assessments of ASIO’s IT systems to ascertain their fitness for holding classified information; and responding to cybersecurity incidents that may involve ASIO’s infrastructure and/or information holdings. 

Can you describe a typical workday? What is the last thing you worked on?

Given ASIO’s broad utilisation of technology in both corporate and operational contexts, no two days in IT Security are ever the same. Some days, I have many meetings with various ASIO staff to discuss the technologies they want to use in a corporate/operational capacity and offer advice as to how they may securely implement those technologies. On other days, I’ll be deep-diving into our systems to see how they are configured and where appropriate, provide advice to their respective IT staff to fix any security vulnerabilities that I find. Some people may find these continual shifts in focus to be exhausting, but I love it – as it enables me to learn something new (whether it be about technology, ASIO, or myself) each day.

The last thing I worked on was an intensive security assessment of one of our new systems, which is seeking permission to hold classified information. As you can imagine, the security standard for the system was set very high, which required me to collaborate with its administrators to ensure it met this standard. With the assessment complete, my reports have now gone to the relevant decision-making bodies to decide on the next steps for the system.

What are the career prospects with your job? / Where could you or others in your position go from here?

Specialising in cyber-security within ASIO means that I get to work with, and learn from, some of the best cyber-security experts in the industry. Consequently, I have (and will likely continue to have) very strong career prospects - both inside and outside of the public sector - within the cyber-security industry. Furthermore, as ASIO is a technologically-enabled organisation, IT Security is fundamentally involved in the strategic outlook for the Organisation and its utilisation of technology. Experience in this field provides me with significant opportunity to pursue internal management roles in the future.

What would your career be if you weren’t doing what you’re doing now?

If weren’t working with ASIO, I would likely be performing a similar cyber-security function in a different sector. If cyber-security didn’t work out, I might have gone into video game development.

What do you love the most about your job? Which kind of task do you enjoy the most?

Though I appreciate that performing a cyber-security function within other industries has its rewards, I love knowing that my work here at ASIO is directly contributing to the security of Australia and its citizens. Whether it be through enhancing the security of a system that holds classified information or assisting operational staff in the secure implementation of their systems, I can always draw a direct line between my work and the organisation’s mission. Due to this, I have a strong sense of purpose working at ASIO, which I don’t think I could get anywhere else.

Being an intelligence agency, ASIO has its fair share of unique, complex problems to solve. Collaborating with a variety of people from all walks of life (both professionally and personally) to solve these problems is easily the task that I enjoy the most.

What’s the biggest limitation of your job?  Do you bear a lot of responsibility? Do you have to work on weekends? Are stress levels high?

There is certainly a lot of responsibility (and sometimes stress) that comes with working at ASIO, particularly within the cyber-security space. This responsibility not only comes with the mission of the organisation but also from balancing the wide variety of tasking that you must undertake to support that mission. That being said, the sense of fulfilment you get when you complete that tasking always outweighs the stress it may cause whilst you are performing it. Plus, ASIO has several support functions to help its staff deal with stress, including internal psychologists that are available to work through any personal or professional stressors that you may have.

Typically, ASIO staff work within what is called Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities (SCIFs), which allows us to view and handle classified information. Understandably, we can’t take such information outside of the SCIF – which means once you leave work each day, you are much better equipped to disconnect entirely. I have not had to work on weekends, but have colleagues that have needed to do so to support ASIO’s operations. That being said, these staffs are reimbursed for their efforts – either monetarily or through time-in-lieu arrangements

Which three pieces of advice would you give to a current university student? They don’t necessarily have to be related to your role or even be career-focused.

  1. Good grades do not necessarily equate to good subject knowledge; of the two, make sure you have the latter (because that’s what employers care about!).
  2. Always keep one eye on the big picture, and another on the small picture – you can’t work to one without the other. Think of each immediate task or event in your life as a stepping stone to your big picture, and you’ll find a lot more purpose in doing them.
  3. It’s okay to not know what you want to do in life - it doesn’t mean that you can’t do anything, it means that you have virtually limitless options to try! I’ve met so many people within ASIO that started their careers in fields like entomology, music composition, and baking – but found their way here because they saw the opportunity to try something different and took it.

Malik

Strategic Intelligence Analyst

ASIO is a great workplace in that as an Intelligence Analyst, every three years (if you want a change) you can move into another analytical role in another section of the Organisation.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Western Sydney, graduating from High School in 2010. The area I grew up in was quite culturally diverse, which was likely a contributing factor in my developing a love of travel. Before joining the organisation, I travelled widely through Asia, Europe and the Middle East.

How did you get your current job?

I came into ASIO via the Intelligence Development Program. While I was initially unsuccessful in gaining a place on the training program, I was offered a job as an Intelligence Support Officer. Over the following years, I gained a wealth of experience in various roles throughout the Organisation, including an eight-month overseas posting. In 2017, I applied for the Intelligence Analyst Development Program and was successful in my application. Following the completion of training, and rotations through two different analytical teams, I found my fit as a Strategic Intelligence Analyst within the National Threat Assessment Centre.

How did you choose your specialisation (compared to others)? / Were you weighing up any other alternatives before choosing this specialisation?

I have always had a passion for history, both modern and ancient, and was initially enrolled in an archaeology degree. In my first year of study, I found my interests in early Islamic history had parallels in my interest in modern history and politics of the Middle-East and North Africa region. After much discussion, I chose to change my degree to International Relations with a particular focus on the politics of the Middle East.

After completing my degree, and travelling/studying in the Middle East for a while, I identified ASIO as an employer who would seemingly value from both my academic skills and personal interests, as well as support me in seeking further development. 

What was your interview process like? What kind of questions were you asked? 

I’m not going to lie, the process was long and rigorous. Following the submission of my application, I was asked to complete a series of aptitudes tests, as well as a short written analytical exercise (timed). The next process was an assessment centre, where I and around thirty other individuals completed a series of exercises, both individual and group-based, followed by a panel interview. While part of the interview process, the assessment centre was a good opportunity for me to get a feel of what type of work ASIO does and the type of analytical roles on offer in the Organisation.  

Running parallel to the assessment process was my security clearance process. This was personally quite daunting. However, it was made clear to me very early on that interviews were more of a conversation, and the experience was comfortable enough.

What does your employer do?

As the nation’s security service, ASIO protects Australia from violent, clandestine and deceptive efforts to harm its people and undermine its sovereignty. We do this through intelligence collection and assessment, and the provision of advice to the Australian Government, government agencies, industry and international partners.

What are your areas of responsibility?

As a strategic intelligence analyst, I have developed subject matter expertise on a range of priority Counter-Terrorism topics for ASIO. Through the application of my own expertise, as well as strategic analytical tradecraft, I actively enable ASIO’s response to these priorities by providing strategic advice to colleagues, National Intelligence Community and other Government partners, as well as foreign partners with comparable priorities. This advice is provided both in written analytical reports and briefings and/or discussions between partners.

My work directly contributes to colleagues’ and partners’ understanding of the security environment, including any trends to be aware of current or in the future and potential mitigation strategies. 

Can you describe a typical workday? What is the last thing you worked on?

Given the fluidity of the security environment, no day is ever truly the same. One day, I may have meetings with ASIO colleagues, Government and/or international partners on a range of topics. Other days, I may be asked to draft strategic advice to inform either ASIO senior management (including the Director-General) or the Ministry/Minister of Home Affairs in higher-level discussions on security. At times, I may be asked to conduct a deep-dive into a topic of increasing priority with the aim of producing strategic reporting on the topic—this was the case following the 2019 Christchurch Terrorist attack with myself and many of my strategic analyst colleagues being re-tasked to work on Right-Wing Extremism as a topic post-incident in support of the investigation. Other days, I get lucky and get to do what I truly love—get lost in my research so as to further develop my understanding of my areas of expertise, which allows me to produce high-level analytical products which inform Government.
The last thing I worked on was a strategic analytical report on how the release of terrorist offenders from Australian prisons may impact on the Australian security environment. This area is of growing interest to a range of Commonwealth and State Government partners, as a number of long-term terrorist prisoners are due for release in the next five years.

What are the career prospects with your job? / Where could you or others in your position go from here?

ASIO is a great workplace in that as an Intelligence Analyst, every three years (if you want a change) you can move into another analytical role in another section of the Organisation. This means if you’ve gotten tired of working on Counter-Terrorism, you could rotate into an area looking at Foreign Interference. In terms of where could I go from here, well, there are a range of promotion prospects internally within the Organisation, as well as an increasing number of opportunities to be seconded out either to other Government departments or international partners as an analytical representative of ASIO. 

What would your career be if you weren’t doing what you’re doing now?

Before joining ASIO, I was already employed in the Australian Public Service (APS) with (then) the Department of Immigration and Citizenship so I assume I either would have continued my prospects there or another section of the APS. Alternatively, I also had an interest in working for a range Non-Government Organisation (NGO) in the Middle East, specifically those NGO’s focused on the provision of education in politically restrictive environments, so I imagine I could have gone down that path as well.

If I continued with my archaeology degree, I’d probably be in some part of the world digging up ceramic shards.

What do you love the most about your job? Which kind of task do you enjoy the most?

I personally enjoy getting out there and talking to a huge range of partners about topics I am passionate (and have written) about. Sometimes I have to pinch myself when sitting in a room filled with international partners like FBI and MI5 (to name just two), discussing our shared experiences as subject matter experts from our respective Organisations.  

What’s the biggest limitation of your job?  Do you bear a lot of responsibility? Do you have to work on weekends? Are stress levels high?

Providing strategic advice to Government comes with A LOT of responsibility and a requirement for analytical rigour. This sometimes also means delivering advice telling stakeholders things they do not necessarily want to hear. While some advice may be challenging, our partners know just how much rigour is behind it and respect the work and advice we provide under the ASIO brand.

In terms of stress, there are occasions where advice has to be provided within VERY tight time-frames, and with the same amount of rigour. This can make for a bit of a frazzled experience; however, at no times have I ever felt unsupported by my team or the Organisation as a whole. I know that my colleagues are always there to help in such situations and the Organisation places a huge level of importance on work/life balance and mental health.

Which three pieces of advice would you give to a current university student? They don’t necessarily have to be related to your role or even be career-focused.

  1. Stay curious! Sometimes, something you’re interested in personally may be just what ASIO needs in terms of subject matter expertise (cool story – have published an analytical report on ‘online meme sub-culture in Extreme Right-Wing’)
  2. It’s never too late for a change – if you’ve started down one career path but another speaks to your interests, follow it!
  3. Never undervalue life experience – travelling and seeing the world can be just as valuable as hitting the books.

Rebecca

Intelligence Officer

I know that my job directly contributes to the protection of Australia’s security, and for me, that is the best kind of job satisfaction I could ask for.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in a small rural town, before moving to the coast for my high school years. After my graduation, I moved to Brisbane for university and have been fortunate enough to live all around Australia, and even overseas, since finishing school!

How did you get your current job? 

I applied to work with ASIO while I was still at university, joining the Organisation as a trainee on the Intelligence Officer Development Program, during which I undertook analytical and operational training. The twelve-month program was both challenging and exceptionally rewarding and was a blend of classroom-based and real-world exercises followed by work placements in actual ASIO teams. On completion of the program, I joined the ASIO workforce as an Intelligence Officer working from a regional office. In addition to loving my current job, I know that each new posting will bring a host of opportunities to try something new and different. 

How did you choose your specialisation (compared to others)? / Were you weighing up any other alternatives before choosing this specialisation?

I chose to apply for the Intelligence Officer Development Program as I felt this particular role best aligned with my skills, personality and interests. It can be challenging to know which path to take when you finish university, and I did have a couple of career paths I was considering. Now that I worked with ASIO for a few years, I have no doubts that I made the right choice for me!

What was your interview process like? What kind of questions were you asked?

The ASIO recruitment process can be lengthy due to the requirement that ASIO Officers hold a security clearance, so you’ll need to be patient! Having said that, I found the interview and assessment process to be pretty straightforward, much like you would experience with other job applications. There are a number of steps in the process, including interviews, assessments and paperwork. My recruitment experience was positive – I was kept up to date throughout and knew I was able to call the Recruitment team if I had any questions regarding my application.    

What does your employer do?

ASIO is Australia’s Security Intelligence Organisation. We exist to protect Australia, and its people, from threats to national security. This is done through the collection and analysis of information, and the provision of advice to the Australian Government and departments, and to industry. The collection of information occurs through a number of methods, some of which is done by Intelligence Officers and is then collated and assessed by ASIO Analysts. This advice is provided to ASIO’s customers for consideration in the formation and development of decisions related to national security.    

What are your areas of responsibility?

As an Intelligence Officer, my role is to collect information which is then analysed and used to form assessments and provide national security advice to the Australian Government and other customers. Intelligence Officers must be attentive to detail to ensure the information being provided for analysis is detailed and precise. ASIO collects information through various methods, one of which is engaging with members of the Australian public, and working collaboratively with other ASIO teams all around Australia to achieve organisational objectives. 

Can you describe a typical workday? What is the last thing you worked on?

Well, that’s the thing – I don’t have a typical workday! No two days are the same, and what you had planned to do that day can change quickly. Most days will involve some time in the office and some time out of the office (sometimes I am required to travel inter-state), and there is always something interesting to work on. My work varies depending on the security environment and current organisational priorities.

What are the career prospects with your job? / Where could you or others in your position go from here?

Career opportunities for an Intelligence Officer are varied. Intelligence Officer’s work on 3-5 year postings so you get to try a different role every few years. Completion of the Intelligence Officer Development Program also qualifies you to work as an ASIO Analyst and you may have the opportunity to work overseas, or with other government agencies, in addition to considering promotion in both operational and corporate teams. Completing a development program or traineeship with ASIO is a unique opportunity that I found has equipped me with excellent life skills which will serve me well wherever I end up in the future.   

What would your career be if you weren’t doing what you’re doing now?

It is hard to imagine myself in a different career - I love working with people in order to help them and improve their lives. My current job allows me to work with people, for the ultimate goal of keeping Australia and Australians safe.  Had I not followed this path, I would likely have pursued a career as a Psychologist. 

What do you love the most about your job? Which kind of task do you enjoy the most?

I am fortunate to be able to say I enjoy going to work, and that I love my job. I know that my job directly contributes to the protection of Australia’s security, and for me, that is the best kind of job satisfaction I could ask for. It’s a bonus that I get to work with great people, on the subject matter that I find very interesting. I appreciate that no two days are the same for me and that I am constantly learning and challenging myself to be a more effective and creative Intelligence Officer. 

What’s the biggest limitation of your job?  Do you bear a lot of responsibility? Do you have to work on weekends? Are stress levels high?

One of the biggest limitations as an ASIO Officer is the inability to discuss my work with those close to me, or even say where it is that I work. While it is challenging, it is necessary and it is definitely very manageable. 

Being an Intelligence Officer means I do bear significant responsibility. However, we all work in teams who are there to share the load, and ASIO provides excellent support mechanisms if ever needed. There are occasions where I need to work late or on weekends; however, I generally work normal business hours.

Which three pieces of advice would you give to a current university student? They don’t necessarily have to be related to your role or even be career-focused.

  1. Take advantage of opportunities when they are available! I truly believe that I am where I am today because of some of the opportunities I took throughout my university years. They often pushed me out of my comfort zone but they allowed me to grow and mature as a person, and develop new skills which have served me well so far. 
  2. Choose a career that you are genuinely interested in. Work is so much easier when you enjoy doing your job.
  3. There is more than one way to achieve a goal. If you don’t get it the first time around, it does not mean it’s not achievable, and sometimes (at least in my experience), you have to try a few times in a few different ways – and that’s ok because it gets you there in the end!

Alex

Technical data analyst at ASIO

The work that I do requires me to be continually learning and keeping myself updated on new methods in AI and for me that is a massive bonus.

How did you get your current job?

I joined ASIO via the Technologist Graduate Program. This program saw me rotate through three different technical areas of ASIO. At the end of this program, I knew I wanted to work in a Technical Analysis team – where I am now working.

How did you choose your specialisation? Were you weighing up any other alternatives before choosing this specialisation?

During my studies I developed an interest in solving difficult problems but realised that life in academia wasn’t for me. I wanted to be able to contribute to society through the work I do and this led me to apply for the Technologist Program and Department of Defence Graduate Program. Both of these programs offered a wide variety of work that centred on problem solving, but ultimately I ended up at ASIO because I felt they had a wider technical remit allowing me to solve problems across more fields.

What was your interview process like? What kind of questions were you asked?

The recruitment process as a whole was understandably long. This is due to the fact that in applying for this position, you also apply for a high-level security clearance. The initial application process asked about my technical and people skills, followed by an assessment centre process where the focus was shifted to written and verbal communication and team skills – not so much about technical skills. Of course, there was also an interview as part of this process, but the panel was more interested in my ability to learn rather than specific skills. ASIO requires core skills such as problem solving and adaptability; the rest can be learned.

What does your employer do?

ASIO is responsible for advising ministers and authorities of the Commonwealth with respect to security matters when they relate to Australians or people and events in Australia. ASIO also provides support when appropriate to law enforcement and other Australian intelligence organisations. All of this is undertaken with the intention of keeping Australia safe.

What are your areas of responsibility?

The team that I am working in is responsible for helping others in the organisation answer technical questions that are data heavy, along with building artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to problems, like translating text and classifying objects in images to start automating resource intensive work. This allows people to answer more pressing questions and make better informed decisions.

Can you describe a typical work day? What was the last thing you worked on?

On a typical day I’d spend most of my time writing or adapting code to work towards implementing artificially intelligent solutions. Since the world of AI is progressing rapidly, it is not uncommon to spend parts of a day reading up on the current state-of-the-art practices to ensure that what we are working on is the best it can be. The last thing that I worked on was integrating language based AI into the workplace. This resulted in a machine translation tool, along with looking into machine question and answering.

What are the career prospects with your job? Where could you or others in your position go from here?

Within the Australian intelligence community there are a wide variety of jobs that I could end up doing, based on my personal interests. There is the possibility to transfer at level or for a promotion if the positions arise. I could also work for companies who have a desire to analyse large datasets or companies that provide AI solutions to their customers.

What would your career be you weren’t doing what you’re doing now?

For me, I’d most likely be undertaking a PhD in physics if I didn’t end up here.

What do you love most about your job? What kind of task do you enjoy?

The work that I do requires me to be continually learning and keeping myself updated on new methods in AI and for me that is a massive bonus. Having a research background, I enjoy studying and learning new things. With the way that technology is evolving, there will always be something new to research or better ways of doing our work. The work here also has the added benefit of supporting Australia and keeping the community safe.

What’s the biggest limitation of your job? Do you bear a lot of responsibility? Do you have to work on weekends? Are the stress levels high?

There isn’t ever enough time to do everything, so it all comes down to being able to make sure that what we’re working on has the greatest impact with the time and resources we have available. My role does not require weekend work and the organisation is supportive of flexible working hours.

Which three pieces of advice would you give to a current university student?

  • Keep an eye out for opportunities that seem interesting and find out when their positions will be advertised – don’t miss out on something you could be interested in!
  • Don’t be afraid to try something and decide you don’t like it. During my university days I thought that I really wanted to be an academic researcher but having tried that as part of my masters, I didn’t connect with the work as much as I hoped and subsequently ended up applying to work at ASIO.
  • You only fail if you don’t learn anything from it. During my time at university I ended up failing a subject and in doing so I learnt more about myself than I had with any of my successes. If this happens to you, take the time to reflect on how this occurred and determine what you could have done differently – you will always remember this.

A Day in the Life

ASIO


Aiya

ASIO Technologist Graduate

Aiya studied Bachelor of Engineering (Software) at University of New South Wales and is now a Technologist Graduate at ASIO

7:15 AM

After sleeping through my first two alarms, I finally get up and face the morning.  The Canberra ‘traffic’ means I will still end up in the office well before 9 am even if I had slept another 15 minutes, as I want to get away earlier today to take my dog to the dog park. (I definitely don’t miss the set hours of retail).

8:00 AM

Final check of the phone for texts before heading into the office.  Getting through physical security checkpoints at work can feel time consuming, but the cheap, dedicated parking on site more than compensates for it. First check of the emails to see what happened overnight and who is in the office today, some days are busier than others.  COVID means we are currently all still in the office, although we do keep our distance and ensure that anyone that feels evenly remotely unwell is appropriately tested and has a negative result before returning.

8:30 AM

Coffee time!  I meet the other graduates in the internal café to quickly grab a coffee before we go our separate ways.  I love not having to travel out of the office to get coffee and food. 

8:40 AM

Stand-up time! I work in a team that uses some aspects of Agile, mainly daily stand-up’s and a Kanban board, to keep track on what people are working on each day and see if there are any blockers that others can help with.  Today, I’m going to see if I can derive some information from certain records we receive from an external provider.  We anecdotally suspect they periodically may not be meeting their obligatory requirements, but it’s hard to say without looking at a larger number of records.

9:00 AM

Stand-up over, time to get down to work.  I realise the three screens and two mechanical keyboards are probably overkill, but you need to be comfortable when at your desk, right?  I’ve started with writing some scripts to collate the data I’m interested in and filter out records that are not useful to us.  I’m starting small, and will run it while I go to my meetings this afternoon, with hopefully some results to come back to.

10:05 AM

11 warnings and a KeyError, that might explain why I’m not getting any data.

11:30 AM

Data is being collected, processed and showing that some providers are taking four to five times longer to provide information than their counterparts.  I’m going to expand my sample space before heading off to lunch.

12:00 PM

Lunch time! Back to the internal café, they’re doing a Poké bowl special this month.  It’s a nice day so we sit outside for once, taking advantage of the warm Canberra weather while we can.

12:30 PM

Back to the desk, and one of my colleagues is trying to figure out why a build is failing for testing.  I’ve got some time while waiting for my script to finish, so I sit down and we debug it together.  We help each other out as we’re all working for the same mission.

1:00 PM

Off to an operations meeting, where a number of Intelligence Officers are determining how they want to gain additional information on a subject of interest.  There has been chatter of dangerous activities being planned around Australia, and hopefully the information we retrieve through this operation will provide insight into the exact specifics so that it can be swiftly mitigated.  Employees from technical areas are brought in to provide insight into the suitability of actions from a technical standpoint, and I’m along to both understand the process and contribute.

3:00 PM

In what I considered a small miracle (yes, I’m known for my self-deprecation), my code worked and we now have a number of statistics and pretty graphs and further evidence that the provider in question has an issue with select records.  Time to clean the output up, document the process and take this to our external engagement leads.

4:00 PM

A quick desk chat with our engagement leads who handle the relationships with our providers.  They suspect remedial action may be required.  While it is late today, the first job for tomorrow will be organising a time to meet with the external providers and get to the bottom of the issue.

4:15 PM

Time to get away from work.  After trying to figure out the minimum number of doors that can be taken to escape the office, I head home to take my dog for a walk and get ready to head back out.

6:00 PM

The graduates have decided on dodgeball for tonight and select nights over the next 12 weeks.  While I don’t think I’d be the first pick for the team, I’m not fazed as there will be another sport to join after this one I’m sure.

7:30 PM

Burgers and beers to lick our wounds post dodgeball, looks like I wasn’t the only uncoordinated player.

9:00 PM

Back home for a shower and relax before bed.  I think I’ll watch Spycraft on Netflix…

Diversity

ASIO


ASIO desires and requires diversity.  We seek to reflect the people we protect and recognise the value of diverse thinking.

ASIO employees include teachers, engineers, musicians, former representative athletes, tradies, geologists, philosophers, lawyers, journalists and a wide range of STEM specialists.  We are proud Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and second or third generation Australians.  We are introverted, extroverted and neurodiverse.  We are technically minded, corporate and intelligence professionals.

Awards, accreditations and memberships

ASIO is a proud member of:

  • Diversity Council Australia
  • Pride in Diversity
  • Australian Network on Disability

ASIO has been awarded Silver accreditation by the Australian Workplace Equality Index. Their rating is the highest ever for an organisation being assessed for the first time

LGBTI

ASIO


ASIOpen is the LGBTIQ+ employee network in ASIO.

The LGBTIQ+ network supports employees to be open and authentic in the workplace. ASIOpen celebrates the benefits of inclusivity and drives reform on LGBTIQ+ issues through information sharing, hosted events and policy reform.

Disability

ASIO


CapABILITY is the ASIO network for employees with a disability.

CapABILITY works in ASIO to overcome barriers to staff access and participation within ASIO’s physical environment and to promote the acceptance and celebration of neurodiversity within the Organisation.

The network provides compassionate and empathetic support, guidance and mentoring to staff experiencing challenges related to physical and/or mental health issues, caring responsibilities or other life events.

Gender

ASIO


aGENda- ASIO’s gender-equity network promotes equal opportunity for the ASIO workforce of gender.

aGENda organise events and initiatives to ensure gender equity considerations continue to shape the corporate agenda. aGENda is committed to tangible outcomes through policy reform, awareness-raising, research, advocacy and engagement with the government for improved gender equity across the national security community.

ASIO has achieved parity in its total workforce from a gender perspective.

Indigenous

ASIO


Mudyi is the indigenous employee network in ASIO.

ASIO acknowledges the traditional owners of this land and pays respect to Elders past and present. Mudyi is committed to promoting an inclusive workplace culture that values and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, communities and culture and their contribution to ASIO’s mission. The Network seeks to raise awareness and appreciation of Indigenous culture and drive corporate initiatives aimed at improving the workplace experience for Indigenous people.

Cultural Diversity

ASIO


Mozaik is the cultural and linguistic diversity employee network in ASIO.

The Mozaik network is the Cultural and Language Diversity (CALD) network. Mozaik collaborates with staff and management to develop tangible work programs to remove potential barriers of acceptance, advancement and employment for culturally and linguistically diverse members of the workforce.

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