GSK profile banner

GSK Internships

GSK is currently not accepting applications

GSK is a science-led global healthcare company with a special purpose: to help people do more, feel better, live longer. GSK have three global businesses that research, develop and manufacture innovative pharmaceutical medicines, vaccines and consumer healthcare products.

GSK currently has 0 opportunities.
Select the following options:

Past GSK Graduate Hiring Statistics

If you’re interested in working at GSK, understanding when they have opened up applications for their graduate programs, graduate jobs and internships is helpful knowledge to have so you know when you might need to apply. Use the below information to see when GSK hires graduates, but more importantly what graduate degree’s and other student attributes they target for their jobs.


Months

Nov 19Dec 19Jan 20Feb 20Mar 20Apr 20May 20Jun 20Jul 20Aug 20Sep 20Oct 20012343 jobs0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job0 job2 jobs4 jobs0 job0 job0 job
  • count

Job types

  • Internships (100%),

Disciplines

  • Accounting (78%),

  • Administration (22%),

  • Agriculture (22%),

  • Architecture (22%),

  • Actuary (22%),

  • ...show more

Locations

  • Sydney (56%),

  • Auckland (33%),

  • Melbourne (33%),

  • Christchurch (11%),

  • Hobart (11%),

  • ...show more

Work rights

  • Australian Citizen (100%),

  • Australian Permanent Resident (100%),

  • New Zealand Citizen (100%),

Past GSK Internships

Check out some of GSK's past jobs they have posted on GradConnection over the last 12 months. Understanding the details about what a graduate employer is looking for well before applications have opened can sometimes be the edge you need to secure your first graduate program.


GSK 2021 IBL Program - Australia

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

Accounting, Banking and Finance,

...

Locations:

Sydney, Melbourne

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

GSK 2021 IBL Program - New Zealand

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

Accounting, Banking and Finance,

...

Locations:

Auckland (New Zealand)

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

Live Q&A Session - Australia

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

Accounting, Banking and Finance,

...

Locations:

Canberra, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide,

...

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

Live Q&A Session - New Zealand

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

Accounting, Banking and Finance,

...

Locations:

Auckland (New Zealand), Christchurch

...

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

Industry Based Learning Program, Australia, 2021 - Expressions of Interest

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

All Disciplines

Locations:

Melbourne

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

Industry Based Learning Program, New Zealand, 2021 - Expressions of Interest

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

All Disciplines

Locations:

Auckland (New Zealand)

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

2020 - IBL - Quality Associate - NSW

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

Engineering Chemical Processing, Engineering

...

Locations:

Sydney

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

2020 - IBL - Finance Associate - NSW

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

Accounting, Banking and Finance,

...

Locations:

Sydney

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

2020 - IBL - Communications Associate - NSW

Job type:

Internships

Disciplines:

Communications, Marketing and Sales,

...

Locations:

Sydney

Workrights:

Australian Citizen, New Zealand

...

The GSK Story

GSK


GSK is a science-led global healthcare company with a special purpose: to help people do more, feel better, live longer.

GSK have three global businesses that research, develop and manufacture innovative pharmaceutical medicines, vaccines and consumer healthcare products.

In 2018, GSK invested over $7 billion in research and development globally, focusing on science related to the immune system, human genetics and advanced technologies.

The Pharmaceuticals business has a broad portfolio of innovative and established brands with leadership positions in respiratory, HIV and an exciting and innovative pipeline in oncology and immunology.

GSK are the leading vaccines company in the world. Approximately 1 in 4 of the world’s children receive at least one GSK vaccine. The Australian National Immunisation Program ensures that by the time an Australian child starts school, they will have benefited from 9 GSK vaccines, helping to prevent 12 serious infectious diseases including measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis, rotavirus, gastroenteritis and diphtheria.

GSK are also the world’s largest consumer healthcare company with a broad portfolio of products spanning across pain relief, specialist oral health, skin health, nutrition and digestion. Australians and New Zealanders probably know GSK best for trusted brands like Panadol, Voltaren, Sensodyne, Advil and Centrum which have become household names.

GSK’s goal is to be one of the world’s most innovative, best performing and trusted healthcare companies.

GSK’s strategy is to bring differentiated, high-quality and needed healthcare products to as many people as possible, with their three global businesses, scientific and technical know-how and talented people.

Here in Australia, GSK employs around 1500 employees, with offices in Melbourne and Sydney, manufacturing sites in Victoria and New South Wales and sales and medical colleagues in all states and territories.

At GSK, creating an inclusive organisation that respects and promotes the diversity of their employees and the communities they serve is a key focus. The very essence of successful scientific innovation relies on diversity of people and thought.

The Culture

GSK’s values and expectations are at the heart of everything they do and help define their culture – so that together they can deliver extraordinary things for their patients and consumers and make GSK a brilliant place to work. GSK’s values are Patient Focus, Transparency, Respect, Integrity and its expectations are Courage, Accountability, Development, Teamwork.

In 2017, GSK appointed its first female CEO, Emma Walmsley, a mother of four children. Emma has created a culture that ensures GSK is a place where outstanding people do amazing things. As a science-led global healthcare company, GSK exist to help people do more, feel better, live longer. This special purpose – along with their goal of being one of the world’s most innovative, best performing and trusted healthcare companies – helps them attract some of the best and brightest minds in the world.

“We want to represent the modern world that we live, work and compete in, so every single employee can feel supported when they come to work at GSK, and give the best of themselves every day.” – Emma Walmsley, CEO

Social Contribution

GSK are a responsible company and commit to use their science and technology to address health needs, make their products affordable and available, and for their employees to be their best in and out of work.

Living GSK’s mission starts from within. It is important that employees are proud of the work they do, the company they work for and the contributions they make.

GSK’s focus on people is not just about their staff. GSK work closely with local and global communities to support people who need it most.

Globally GSK work with a number of organisations to provide humanitarian donations to those in need. GSK provided donations to more than 80 countries across the world.

A great example of how GSK live their values and expectations is their partnership with Save the Children. GSK have reached over 2.8 million children in 45 countries, and GSK employees have raised over £3.3m which is matched by GSK.

Since its launch in 2009, GSK’s employee volunteering program, PULSE, has sent more than 705 employees from 63 countries to serve 120 non-profits around the world. It has also provided over $38 million worth of skilled services to their partners.

GSK’s Australian and New Zealand staff volunteered more than 1,200 hours through their corporate volunteering program ‘Orange Day’, supporting community organisations like the Abbotsford Convent, Fareshare, OzHarvest and many others.

The Vibe of the Place

GSK are committed to creating a culture and flexible working environment where your work ‘works’ for you, allowing you to perform at you best. You can expect to find yourself in a respectful, professional, supportive and friendly environment. GSK have a flat structure with accessible leaders who are approachable, visible and accessible. It is not uncommon to see a senior leader playing table tennis with a member of the IBL team. For those interested in it, there are plenty of opportunities for after-hours socialising too. Put simply, GSK’s culture is shaped to motivate you to do your best work, in a place where you can be you, feel good and keep growing.

GSK Graduate Stories

GSK


GSK

Isaac Barr
Engineering Graduate
2015 to 2017

Why did you want to work for GSK?

I think what I really found appealing about GSK was the breadth of opportunities that I could pursue as a Chemical Engineer. Whether I want to move into a role where I can help to develop new molecules in the lab to treat devastating illnesses such as HIV, a role where I can design and implement new chemical processes involving complex chemistry, or a role where I can work in a variety of ways to deliver critical medicine to markets all around the world; GSK as a company offers those opportunities. As a graduate, not knowing which direction I may want to take my career, what better place to start?

What degree and university are you a graduate from?

Bachelor of Science (Chemical Systems) and Master of Engineering with Distinction (Chemical), University of Melbourne

What type of work do you do?

I work in a Technical Development team within GSK’s ‘Global Manufacture and Supply’ business. To summarise, the function of a Technical Development team is to introduce new medicines into commercial production within GSK. This is an incredibly exciting and challenging role as a Chemical Engineer, as there are often many technical challenges to overcome in order to deliver new products.

What was your pathway into the business?

I applied directly to the Future Leaders Program having previously completed Vacation Programs with ExxonMobil and Orica.

What rotation(s) have you completed so far?

I am currently beginning my second rotation in Singapore at Jurong, a site where active ingredients for several of GSK’s key medicines are produced. Here, I am working in the Technical Development team as a Chemical Engineer supporting the delivery of new production equipment to expand production capacity, as well as supporting routine production.

What are the best aspects of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

There are so many great aspects of the program, it is hard to select just a few. For me, the program has allowed me to live and work abroad in a role that embodies exactly what being a Chemical Engineer means to me. It is pretty hard to top that! But some other great aspects of the program include the flexibility the program gives graduates in allowing them to pursue roles that will benefit them, the access to GSKs management that graduates are afforded, the training that graduates receive, and the high regard in which the program is held internally.

What are some of the challenges of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

There are many new challenges which arise every day at GSK, which is why my job is so exciting! The FLP takes the title seriously, and graduates are given every opportunity to develop skills that will grow them into future leaders. I think this is also reflected in the level of responsibility that graduates are given, and the way graduates are stretched outside their comfort zone.

What advice would you give to students and graduates considering an internship or graduate role at GSK?

The GSK FLP is not your average graduate program. The intent of the program is to grow the future leaders of the company; with that comes a lot of perks that will help kick-start your career! Not only that, but you will have the opportunity to work in a variety of great areas that truly make a difference to people lives.

How would you describe the impact of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK, on your career so far?

While I am only at the beginning of my career, I feel the FLP has empowered me to shape how my career is going to look. I have developed a global network of people I can reach out to throughout my career and have been given experiences that I would otherwise not have if not for the FLP.

It is now 2020, what has changed since the above questions were answered in 2017?

Since joining the FLP in 2015, I’ve worked in several roles across the Pharma Supply Chain. As an FLP, I worked as a Project Engineer, then moved to Singapore to be a Technical Development Engineer, then back in Australia, I moved into Operations; firstly, as a Production Engineer and then an Operations Supervisor.

Post FLP, I’ve been a Product Owner in the Technical function and now, I’m the Site Technical Lead on the Site Leadership Team. This team are accountable for overseeing the site’s operations, it’s 320 employees and the supply to 58 markets globally through approximately half a billion doses of medicine annually.

How has the FLP program helped you?

My current role has allowed me to build on leadership skills that were being developed since day 1 of the Future Leaders Program. My development both throughout the FLP and since has been immensely accelerated as a result of the training, structure, and support the program was able to foster.


GSK

Belinda Fraser
Human Resources Graduate
2016 to 2018

Why did you want to work for GSK?

Initially I was attracted to GSK because it is a multinational company with opportunities to develop and work abroad. Working for an international organisation can be challenging at times but you have scope to learn about different markets, how they operate and the business culture globally. GSK also stood out to me as an employer because the company values align with my personal values, Transparency, Integrity, Patient Focus and Respect for People.

What degree and university are you a graduate from?

I graduated from Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, in December 2015 with a Bachelor of Commerce (Human Resource Management)

What type of work do you do?

So far, I have had the opportunity to work through the merit and bonus review process, liaise with third party benefit providers and complete job evaluations and benchmarking.

What was your pathway into the business?

I completed my 12-month IBL program before completing my final year of uni (whilst working as a HR Advisor at GSK) and ultimately being successful for the first HR FLP role in Australia.

How did your IBL year influence your desire to continue with the business in a graduate role?

I completed my IBL year with GSK in 2014 and it had a huge bearing on my decision to continue working for the organisation and ultimately applying for the Future Leaders Program. Over the course of my placement I was trusted with valuable work and given responsibility that allowed me to develop both my HR technical and general professional skills. I had firsthand knowledge of the company culture and opportunities available to those who work hard and wanted to be an ongoing part of that.

What rotation(s) have you completed so far?

I have just started my first rotation in the Total Reward team; so far, I have had the chance to work on annual bonus and merit review as well as job evaluations and benchmarking.

What are the best aspects of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

It is probably too early to make a full assessment but at this stage I can say that the support network you have around you is second to none. I have a diverse network of people (manager, home manager, alumni mentor, business mentor, program lead and coordinator as well as other key stakeholders) with vested interests in my development ensuring I make the most of my opportunities and providing me with feedback along the way.

What are some of the challenges of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

Again, it is probably too soon to say; my challenge is probably different to others as I was already an employee at GSK when I made the transition to FLP. I have had to separate myself from the previous role I held working with managers on a daily basis to working largely with business partners and consultants.

What advice would you give to students and graduates considering an internship or graduate role at GSK?

My advice to students considering an internship or graduate role at GSK would be to apply. My own journey is an example of how much you can learn and develop through the IBL or Future Leaders programs and essentially fast-track your career.

How would you describe the impact of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK, on your career so far?

So far, it has given me a very different experience to the HR role I was in previously and I am excited to keep moving into fast paced roles in the future. As mentioned, I have a great support network that will enable me to develop my professional, technical and leadership skills over the course of the program.

It is now 2020, what other FLP rotations have you completed since the above questions were answered in 2016?

As the HR FLPI rotated through the following roles:

  • Total Reward: Provided specialist support to the business through delivery of the bonus/merit program, role grading, benchmarking and reward projects.
  • HR Generalist (Boronia): Partnered with the Boronia manufacturing business to deliver the people agenda through talent review, coaching and driving an engagement program.
  • Vaccines Marketing Associate: Supported Brand Managers to deliver the 2017/18 operational plan, working cross functionally to create review and approve marketing campaigns.
  • APAC Recruitment Projects: Collaborated with external partners and Recruitment Leads across Asia Pacific to deliver recruitment marketing projects improving the candidate experience.

Post FLP, what role have you found yourself in?

Since completing the program, I have accepted a commercial role:

  • Vaccine Account Manager: Delivering the marketing strategy through face-to-face and virtual interactions with Healthcare Professionals ensuring they have relevant information and resources to proactively discuss vaccination with patients.

How the FLP program has helped to leverage your career to where you are today:

  • Networking: Throughout my rotations I worked closely with various teams and leaders, the trust and credibility I built during this time allowed me to move outside of the HR function when my program finished.
  • Development: Access to inspiring line managers and business leaders who I can learn from.

GSK

Jaison Ni
Engineering Graduate
2015 to 2017

Why did you want to work for GSK?

There are many reasons that made me want to work for GSK, but the reason that influenced me the most is GSK’s culture and values of respect for people, patient-focus and integrity strongly align with my personal values. Having discovered that GSK demonstrates its commitment to the community through projects such as Orange Day, and GSK’s decision to lower drug prices by up to 25% in 50 of the poorest countries, I feel that this matches well with my desire to help others less fortunate than myself. In addition, I believe that GSK’s dedication to research and development in countries all around the world is highly admirable.

What degree and university are you a graduate from?

Bachelor of Chemical Engineering (Honours) and Bachelor of Pharmaceutical Science (Formulation) from Monash University, Melbourne

What type of work do you do?

I am currently in my second rotation as a Production Engineer. My main responsibilities are to look after the new Water For Injection (WFI) plant, which involves troubleshooting and ensuring all maintenance tasks are performed on time. I am also an engineer of various projects which are implemented to improve the production system from a quality, safety and efficiency perspective.

What was your pathway into the business?

I did two summer internships with GSK as an engineer before I joined the graduate program. These internships took place at the GSKT site (China) and the Port Fairy site (previously owned by GSK). After these internships, I was sure that GSK was the perfect company for me because of the culture and the learning opportunities it provided me with.

What rotation(s) have you completed so far?

For my first rotation, I was in process validation, part of the Quality Department. My main responsibilities were to perform routine re-qualification of various processes and equipment to ensure they are compliant with regulatory requirements. I also designed qualification tests for newly implemented processes and equipment to ensure their performance mets quality standards.

I am currently in my second rotation as a Production Engineer.

What are the best aspects of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

One of the hardest things we face as graduates is transitioning from University to full time work. The Future Leaders program has an excellent on-boarding program which provided me with a broad network of individuals to support this transition including my line manager and my mentor.

In my first year, I was invited to the GSK HQ in the UK to meet other Future Leader Program graduates from Europe, Asia and Central America. This allowed me to get a better understanding of GSK, the global culture, also expanded my network.

What are some of the challenges of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

For me, developing my interpersonal skills in a professional context has challenged me at times; however, I am supported through this development in the program.

What advice would you give to students and graduates considering an internship or graduate role at GSK?

One piece of advice I would give is to be curious and challenge positively. By asking “why” and challenging the people you work with positively, you are generating quality discussions and knowledge sharing moments. This is where you will learn the most and gain a wider understanding of the site and processes.

How would you describe the impact of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK, on your career so far?

By being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK, I have gained a better understanding of the business by exposing myself to 3 different roles. In addition, it is also building my engineering and leadership capabilities by offering me both tailored technical and leadership training. This sets up a solid career foundation for me at GSK.


GSK

Sarah McPherson
Commercial Graduate
2016 to 2017

Why did you want to work for GSK?

GSK presented the perfect opportunity to me, an opportunity to combine my passion for Science & Technology with the new skills I had recently developed through a post-graduate business degree. The patient focus and business values of GSK stood out to me as I waded through what sometimes feels like a sea of graduate programs.
This was absolutely consolidated for me throughout the application and assessment process, and after my first face to face interaction with GSK, I knew that this was a company that I wanted (and needed) to be a part of.

What degree and university are you a graduate from?

Bachelor of Science (Human Structure & Function) from the University of Melbourne and Masters of Business (Science & Technology) from Monash University, Melbourne.

What type of work do you do?

Having only just started in my role within the Primary Care Marketing team, I’m currently doing A LOT of learning. Learning about how marketing works in a commercial pharmaceutical setting but also learning about how GSK runs as a global entity and how each team fits into that. This year I will be focusing on the distribution of information to Health Care Professionals and influencing the market share and growth of GSK certain products.

What was your pathway into the business?

During my final semester of uni I began to search through graduate programs, looking for something that really captured my interest. I applied for the GSK Future Leaders Program online and went through the assessment process. I was introduced to so many key business personnel through this process which only secured for me that this was a business that I wanted to be a part of and gave me confidence walking through the front doors on my first day.

What are the best aspects of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

From the moment I walked in the door I have consistently felt such a high level of support (both professionally and personally). It really does feel like everyone in the business is rooting for you.

Another key draw card for me was the breadth of opportunity in the program. Being presented with three different opportunities to challenge myself and learn is exactly what I was looking for at such an early stage of my professional career.

What are some of the challenges of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK?

The initial challenge I have faced is purely transitioning into the professional life. I’m learning rapidly and adapting to the business. I foresee that the Future Leaders Program will place me outside of my comfort zone and push me to develop leadership and interpersonal skills I may not have the opportunity to develop otherwise.

What advice would you give to students and graduates considering an internship or graduate role at GSK?

I think the most important thing is to just be yourself and give each opportunity your best shot. Being able to reflect on where your current strengths lie and which attributes you may like to develop further will hold you in great stead for any internship or graduate role. Back yourself and your passions, and have a think about how you would like to fit into an organisation like GSK.

How would you describe the impact of being part of the Future Leaders program at GSK, on your career so far?

The Future Leaders Program is an opportunity like no other. So far the program has encouraged me to think about my interpersonal skills, how these skills can be further developed and how they will help me to make a meaningful impact throughout my career. I can only foresee more experiences that push me to adapt, change and develop as a both a leader and an individual.

It is now 2020, what other roles have you completed since the above questions were answered in 2016?

I was lucky enough to have my FLP journey extended by adding in an international assignment to work in ViiV Healthcare in the US. The role I held as the Innovation Program Manager for Implementation Science in HIV was incredibly rewarding and invigorating. At the end of that year I officially rolled off the FLP into a role back in GSK Australia as a Sales & Brand Manager in Respiratory (Secondary Care).

Day in the Life Stories

GSK


GSK

George Ham
Established Brands Associate IBL

6.00 AM
I don’t know why but even with a good night’s sleep, there is always a temptation to go back to sleep.

6.30 AM
I make way to the gym. Time to wake up by engaging those muscles!

8.00 AM
I’m on my way to work from the gym. It’s always busy around this time with commuters but I can be at peace with my earphones on.

8.30 AM
I grab a desk and get ready for the day by first connecting my laptop to the screen. We have free seating so I can literally sit anywhere but I like standing desks because I can alternate between sitting and standing.

8.45 AM
After checking my email and calendar, I write down my priorities for the day and make my way to the kitchen. I like the convenience of not having to carry my breakfast around and just keeping my necessities in the office kitchen. The menu is often vegemite (or marmite) on toast or fruit and yogurt salad.

9.15 AM
I’ve finished my breakfast (I’m a fast eater!) and start off work by breezing past any admin tasks or sending off replies to emails I received overnight. This gets me in the rhythm of working and there is no better feeling than to tick things off the priority list.

10.00 AM
If I do have a morning meeting, it’s usually around 10.00 am. Today my manager is checking in to discuss the progress of my work and help me decide on a few sticky issues and prioritise. It’s quite casual but at the same time, you develop a strong bond with your manager. GSK NZ is a very lean organisation where you get exposure to many things. Focusing on key initiatives is one of the biggest learning of my IBL journey so far.

11.00 AM
It’s time for a cup of coffee. A bit later than others perhaps but Nespresso machine in the kitchen is always available and it makes pretty good coffee. So over a cup of coffee, I like to have a chat with whoever is around. Literally everyone is up for a chat and you always learn something new.

12.00 PM
I often have lunch in the office but today I’m heading out with a bunch of colleagues to try out a new place that has just opened. Being in the CBD, the option for food is endless. We also go for a walk along the waterfront after lunch to stretch our legs and enjoy the view.

1.00 PM
Coming back into the office, I go into a quiet room, designed for us to use when making phone calls and joining teleconferences. I’m on a phone call with an external stakeholder to discuss how I could take my project forward with them. Whether it be customers or agency, internal or external, building professional relationships is another key learning from my IBL journey so far.

2.00 PM
I’ve got time to myself on the desk to work on my project and put together everything I’ve gathered through discussions with different stakeholders. I find it important to leave some time for myself to digest and really think through what my work means to the recipient and how it should be best presented. Working in the pharmaceutical industry and therefore impacting patients’ lives, I need to be extra vigilant. Having said that, being able to impact patients’ lives, when you think about it, it’s an awesome thing to get up in the morning for! (That’s why I can wake up at 6.00 am, you see.)

3.00 PM
Working in a corporate, I have many more colleagues overseas. With New Zealand ahead of everyone in time zone, I often interact with my overseas colleagues around this time. Today’s afternoon meeting is about supply update on key medicine GSK supplies. There is a culture of asking questions at GSK and although quite junior, my queries for the supply of certain medicine are taken note of and addressed. Working in market access, it is critical to make sure that medicines arrive on time because this can have a huge impact on patients’ lives. Often the cross-functional team works to ensure a stable supply of medicine for NZ patients.

5.00 PM
After an eventful day, it’s time to pack up. It’s always nice to revisit the priority list I made in the morning and seeing them all ticked off. I make a list of things to do tomorrow and send a few last-minute emails before shutting down my laptop.

5.30 PM
I arrive at Victoria Park for a game of touch rugby. GSK participates in a corporate league and has games every Monday after work. It’s a good opportunity to bond with colleagues even more.

7.00 PM
After a hot shower, I make myself dinner and take time to relax for a while. I find resting to be just as important as working and I do things like watching on Netflix, listening to music, reading a good book, or just browsing on the web.

9.30 PM
It’s time to do a bit of studying. GSK has a huge emphasis on personal development and my manager especially has been supportive of my initiative to pursue a postgraduate degree. Come the end of the year, hopefully, I can tick off this development item too!

11.00 PM
I’m back on the haven of my bed. I message and chat with my friends, but I usually dose off quite quickly because… well, I’ve got another day of impacting patients’ lives, haven’t I?


GSK

Nick Woods
Marketing Associate FLP, Nucala

7.30 AM
I gingerly roll out of bed to the sound of my alarm and walk straight into the shower. My morning routine has been made far easier by preparing all my work items the night before, allowing me time to enjoy my Weet-Bix before driving to work.

8.15 AM
Once at work, I must decide where I want to sit for the day. At GSK, we practice a hotdesking system, meaning that people sit at different desks each day to improve collaboration between colleagues. Being one of the earlier people in the office, I’m usually able to find a seat near the window.

Once I find my desk, I grab my lunch and head to the kitchen to make a cup of coffee. In the kitchen, I bump into a fellow colleague where we discuss the overnight cricket scores and plans for the weekend.

8.30 AM
After being adequately caffeinated, I open my laptop to check the daily sales numbers and start going through my emails. If anything needs action, then I’ll add it to my to-do-list (which was prepared last night) and then re-prioritise which items need to be addressed first based on their importance.

9.30 AM
I walk into a meeting room and plug my laptop into the projector to facilitate our Brand Team meeting. Operating under a Matrix Structure, GSK creates cross-functional teams for the completion of projects, meaning that stakeholders across various functions (such as finance, communications and medical) all play critical roles in the success of my brand. In these meetings, we discuss what we have been working on, the weeks wins, any risks that need to be flagged and align on where we should be focusing our efforts for the week.

10.30 AM
After our meeting, I grab a snack and have an opportunity to continue working on the key projects on my to-do-list. I walk over to a colleague to ask for their guidance on a particular issue and more often than not they are able to offer a solution to my problem.

12.00 PM
I go back to the kitchen, grab my lunch from the fridge and heat it up in one of the many available microwaves. One of the great things about GSK is the number of friendly staff available to sit and talk to at lunch. After having a nice chat, I then make eye contact with a friend across the room who is pointing at the table tennis table. After a hard fought 3 set match and a satisfying win, I then return to my desk feeling re-energised and ready to continue working.

1.30 PM
I grab my laptop and walk into a meeting room to look at my brand's current performance. This meeting is undertaken with the Finance team where we look at various metrics such as market share shift, sales, and market research. We also look at internal measures to ensure that the sales team is tracking well in the lead measures which should then result in positive sales performance. To close the meeting, we insert our commentary into a PowerPoint Presentation and send it to the Executive Team, to whom we will share our performance with them at a later date.

2.30 PM
After returning to my desk with another coffee, I receive a Skype message on my laptop from a colleague in India asking if I am available for a quick chat. I do a lot of work with our Indian team who help support us in various marketing channels. We discuss a job which I recently briefed them on. After the call, I feel confident that they are clear on what to deliver.

4.00 PM
Every week at 4:00, we have a WebEx meeting scheduled with our National Sales Team. The objective of these calls is to update the sales team on performance, any upcoming head office activities and for the sales team to share what’s happening with their customers. This is a really great way to see what’s working with our customers, what could be improved and to collect rich insights about current market conditions. I take the minutes of the meeting and circulate it with everyone via email once the meeting finishes.

5.15 PM
I quickly go back into the kitchen and eat some tuna and rice before going to cricket training. At GSK, there are changeroom and showering facilities. I get changed and jump back into the car to head to training.

8.00 PM
Once cricket training is finished, I get home and once again start thinking with my stomach. I have some leftovers from last night in the fridge, heat them up and eat dinner with my housemate.

8.30 PM
Before I go to sleep, I take my work notebook out of my bag and do a quick summary of the day. Was I able to complete all of the items on my to-do-list? How did I perform today? What could I improve? After this, I start writing my to-do-list for tomorrow to help my brain turn off from work.

9.00 PM
I start my personal laptop and look at what I could potentially watch on Netflix. By the time I make a choice on what I want to watch, it's nearly bedtime! I then turn my light off to get ready for sleep, being fully aware that I’ll probably browse Facebook for the next hour.


GSK

Deviya Kuruparan
Communications and Change IBL

7.15 AM
I usually start my day around 7:15 am, where I like to take my time getting out of bed. This is because once I’m finally up, I’m moving around the house quickly as I set myself the challenge of getting out on the roads within 20 minutes, so that I can avoid any school traffic in my area.

8.30 AM
After securing the closest parking spot, I make my way into the office to get the day started. Luckily, everything is how I left it the day before so all I need to do is turn on my laptop and we are ready to go.

9.30 AM
My team, consisting of a cross-functional blend of HR, Learning & Development and Communications meets next to our tiered accountability board. This tracks our progress against key objectives and gives us visibility on what the team is working on and how we can work together to provide assistance.

12.30 PM
I usually have lunch around 12:30 pm although sometimes I get too hungry to wait! I take my lunch to the benches outside and have lunch with some of the IBL’s. On Friday’s we like to go offsite to one of the nearby cafes or take our lunch to the park.

2.30 PM
Today at 2:30 pm, we had a special afternoon tea celebrate International Women’s Day where we got to hear from a guest speaker, as well as some inspirational Women at GSK! This is something that I had the pleasure of helping to coordinate so it was great to see it run so smoothly.

3.00 PM
My manager and I have a WIP (work in progress) meeting to make sure were across everything that needs to be achieved for the week, whether that’s an office wide Town Hall, an engagement event or internal communication channels.

4.30 PM
I call it a day and being to pack up, hoping to beat some of the traffic.

5.30 PM
Once I arrive home, I give myself some down time before trying to motivate myself to go the gym. After that I’ll have some dinner with my family and unwind.

9.00 PM
At this point, I’ll most likely end up watching trashy reality TV or Netflix and falling asleep around 11pm, eagerly waiting for a new day.


GSK

Shreenil Amin
Consumer Commercial Future Leader

6.15 AM
I start my day with a swim in my apartment building, shower then iron my shirt and have a bowl of oats before heading to the coffee shop. I order my regular ¾ double shot cappuccino with skinny milk from my local café and start my drive to the Ermington site.

8.30 AM
I make my way into the office and find a good spot to set up my laptop for the day – we have a ‘hot desk’ set up so I rotate my desk location often. I open my emails and look for any urgent items that need to be actioned or any adjustments I’ll need to make to the day’s agenda or meetings.

9.00 AM
My line manager and I have a quick WIP meeting to ensure we are aligned on current projects. We assess the progress of our latest tasks and see if any resource management or delegation of tasks is needed within the team.

9.30 AM
I have my Customer eCommerce strategy meeting with our GM to share our growth ambitions, agreements and key actions needed to achieve executional excellence for the year.

11.00 AM
It’s time for my next coffee, I use the in-house barista coffee machine that we have in the kitchen and chat to one of the respiratory portfolio Brand Managers to gain some marketing insights before my client meeting in the afternoon.

11.30 AM
I type up and circulate minutes and key messages from the earlier meeting to the wider eCommerce team to align them on the plan and actions moving forward.

12.00 PM
I drive down to the local shopping strip with the eCommerce team and one of last year’s Future Leaders to have my favourite Vietnamese BBQ pork roll.

1.00 PM
Stop for a quick espresso, to ensure I bring my A game, on the way to a client meeting at their Bella Vista headquarters.

2.00 PM
We discuss our digital media plans for the retailer and negotiate on a media package that allowed targeted message delivery to our consumers. This ensures we build brand equity and then convert to increased volume sales in line with our growth target for the year.

3.00 PM
I drive back to the office and play some table tennis before getting back to the day’s agenda. I find that I am more productive when I take a break every now and then during the day to do something fun and physical.

4.00 PM
Work on a ROI analysis on all the digital media mechanics to ascertain the most effective form to meet our KPI’s to fuel category growth and share across our online retailers.

6.30 PM
I make my way to basketball training in Redfern and work on some “plays” that the team can use for our game next week.

8.30 PM
Dinner and beers with the basketball team after training where we have some downtime and much-needed banter.

10.00 PM
Finish off my day with some emails and lock in key stakeholder meetings to finalise the media plan over the coming weeks.

Lights out!

Diversity

GSK


Gender

GSK

To accelerate GSK’s progress on inclusion and diversity, globally they are focusing on increasing female representation in senior management throughout the organisation.

  • GSK is a member of the 30% Club gender campaign that aims to achieve 30% female representation in senior management within FTSE 100 companies by 2020.
  • GSK supports the development and career progression for high-performing female managers through their Accelerating Difference programme, which provides coaching and support. GSK also recruits and supports women early in their careers through the graduate and apprentice programmes.
  • GSK’s CEO, Emma Walmsley, is the first (and only) woman to run a major pharmaceutical company.
  • Locally, Christi Kelsey and Lizzie Champion lead the pharmaceuticals and vaccines businesses in Australia and New Zealand respectively.
  • GSK proudly celebrates International Women’s Day, a day where their employees collaborate with ‘Dress for Success’, to empower women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and the development tools to help women thrive in work and in life.
  • GSK Australia’s parental leave policy offers all parents paid primary and secondary caregiver leave, taking into consideration the many ways that someone can become a parent (biologically, adoptive, domestic LGBTQI+ partnership and surrogacy/gestational carrier).

Indigenous

GSK

GSK’s commitment to social responsibility, globally and in the Australian community, is embedded into the way they do business, and GSK are proud to have built their Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) into their ways of working.

  • GSK’s 2018–2020 Innovate RAP is their second RAP, and builds upon the success of their first RAP, which was put in place from 2012–2014.
  • To demonstrate that they're not just talking the talk but actually walking the walk, GSK have released a Progress Summary Report. This document provides details of the actions taken towards their Reconciliation Action Plan deliverables in the first half of 2019.
  • GSK celebrates and participates in National Reconciliation Week (NRW) by providing opportunities to build and maintain relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians. In 2019, this involved a cultural awareness training workshop hosted by their corporate charity partner, Save the Children; a tour of a site of cultural significance for the local Aboriginal tribe (Dight’s Falls) guided by a Wurundjeri Elder; site-wide Mirri Mirri team building and more.
  • GSK provides opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff to engage with cultures and communities by celebrating NAIDOC Week. In 2019, this involved: an exhibition and talk with prominent indigenous photographer and cultural advisor, Professor Wayne Quilliam; volunteering at a local NGO; picking and packing aid packages to be delivered to rural Indigenous communities and more.
  • GSK strives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander supplier diversity within their organisation, having preferred Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses that can be engaged to procure goods and services including Pawa Catering, Nallawilli Office Wares, Outback Coffee, Dreamtime Creative, Tjindgarmi Office wares and Wurundjeri Tribe Council.
  • GSK’s Consumer Healthcare business has developed a plan to help close the gap in oral health by providing product donations and volunteering time to execute oral health initiatives in NSW.
  • In 2019, over 50 GSK employees, along with their friends and family, participated in the 39th annual de Castella Run. This event supports fundraising for the Indigenous Marathon Foundation, a health promotion charity.
  • GSK engages its employees in understanding the significance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural protocols, such as Welcome to Country and Acknowledgement of Country, to ensure there is a shared meaning.
  • In collaboration with the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) the ViiV team provided important HIV and sexual health education for nurses through the ‘Fundamentals of HIV and Sexual Health for primary healthcare nurses’ workshop.

Disability

GSK is a signatory to the Charter for Change at the 2018 UK Government Department for International Development Global Disability Summit, joining other organisations with a common aim to ensure rights, freedoms, dignity and inclusion for people with disabilities.

  • GSK’s Disability Confidence Network (DCN) is a trusted employee resource group for disability inclusion across GSK. The DCN’s partnership with the businesses is valued and strategic to GSK becoming a disability confident employer of choice. The DCN partners with the businesses to ensure all employees feel valued and are able to reach their potential through inclusion, awareness, education, access to workplace adaptations and advocacy.
  • The Global Disability Council was established in 2014 to support GSK’s aim to become a disability confident employer and is fully supported by their Corporate Executive Team and is led by chair Nick Hirons who says, ‘Inclusion for all is critical to our mission to be one of the world's most innovative, best performing and trusted healthcare companies. With approximately 15 per cent of the world's population having a disability – and over 70 per cent of those disabilities aren't visible – we have an immense opportunity to do more for our colleagues, patients and consumers in this space.’
  • GSK provides disability confidence training for managers and employees to become ‘disability confident’ and learn more about inclusive behaviours and language when working with people with disability.
  • At GSK, mental wellbeing is just as important as physical wellbeing. They offer access to counselling through GSK’s 24-hour confidential Employee Assistance Programme (EAP), to support those employees dealing with personal or professional issues that are affecting their wellbeing.
  • GSK’s modern dress codes embrace individual difference and trusts their employees to wear what they feel is appropriate and comfortable for the type of work they do in their day.
  • GSK looks to accommodate all disabilities by making reasonable adjustments where possible.

LGBTI

GSK

GSK’s mission is to provide a supportive, nurturing forum for GSK's employees, across the spectrum of sexual orientation or gender identity. GSK fully supports their gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and straight ally employees, and works with LGBTQI+ employees to increase the awareness and understanding of issues and concerns that impact them.

  • GSK Australia is one of the 851 corporations that publicly supports marriage equality and demonstrated this throughout the 2017 Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey.
  • GSK has a global employee resource group for LGBTQI+ employees and their straight allies, known as Spectrum, which was launched in Australia and New Zealand in 2019.
  • In 2019, GSK’s UK Spectrum group was named Stonewall’s Employee Network Group of the Year.
  • GSK has been ranked in the top 5th percentile for corporate equality in the HRC corporate equality index annual rating for 12 consecutive years.
  • GSK New Zealand is the first pharmaceutical company in NZ to have achieved the Rainbow Tick.
  • GSK has been named as a 2019 Equality Champion by Open For Business LGBT for their strong commitment to advancing LGBT+ equality around the world.
  • Spectrum UK was praised in DIVA’s Rainbow Honours LGBTQ Network Group category by DIVA, the world’s leading media brand for LGBTQI women. This award is given to the corporate LGBTQ staff network which provides the greatest support to its members.
  • All of GSK’s policies are LGBTI+ inclusive. For example, their parental leave policy is inclusive, considering the many ways that LGBTQI+ employees can become parents including adoptive surrogacy/gestational carrier and foster care.

Cultural

GSK

GSK's workforce consists of a diverse population of people with different backgrounds, races and religions. Harnessing these differences creates a productive environment in which everybody feels valued, talent can be fully utilised and organisational goals met.

  • GSK encourages their employees to embrace their culture under the #BeYou agenda. This has seen employees sharing their culture with others in the office through a range of events such as Diwali celebrations, Bollywood dancing, Easter around the world celebrations and more.
  • GSK offers global diversity training to all employees, helping them to understand the many cultures that help to shape our employees and customers.
  • GSK’s early talent recruitment process uses a strengths-based recruitment method, helping to eliminate any bias and allowing a more diverse range of candidates to be considered for the program.
  • Since its launch in 2009, GSK’s employee volunteering program, PULSE, has sent more than 705 employees from 63 countries to serve 120 non-profits around the world. By doing so, GSK’s employees can immerse themselves in different cultures while having a social contribution.
  • Trek for Kids is an employee fundraising initiative from the GSK and Save the Children partnership. Open to GSK employees worldwide, in March 2019 the 40 selected GSK trekkers climbed the Simien Mountains in Ethiopia to raise money for Save the Children. As well as raising more than £270,000, the employees had the invaluable experience of understanding the culture of Ethiopia, and the culture of the other 39 employees on the trek.
  • Globally, GSK is a signatory to the Charter for Change at the 2018 UK Government Department for International Development Global Disability Summit, joining other organisations with a common aim to ensure rights, freedoms, dignity and inclusion for people with disabilities.

Awards, accreditations and membership

GSK

GSK believes that all employees bring something unique to GSK and when they combine their knowledge, experiences and styles together, the impact is incredible. Because of this belief, GSK has earned many awards, accreditations and memberships at both a global and local level.

  • GSK New Zealand is the first pharmaceutical company in NZ to have achieved the Rainbow Tick.
  • GSK was listed #6 on Stonewall Top Employer List for 2020.
  • In 2019, GSK’s UK Spectrum group was named Stonewall Employee Network Group of the Year.
  • In 2019, GSK were named an Equality Champion by Open For Business for their strong commitment to advancing LGBTQI+ equality around the world.
  • Spectrum UK 'Commended' in DIVA’s Rainbow Honours LGBTQ staff network which provides the greatest support to its members.
  • GSK has been ranked in the top 5th percentile for corporate equality in the HRC corporate equality index annual rating for 12 consecutive years.

Office Tour

GSK


GSK Office Tour at Johnston Street, Abbotsford Melbourne

Take a sneak peek inside GSK's head office at Johnston Street, Abbotsford Melbourne.

GSK is located just northeast of Melbourne’s CBD, close to the Yarra river and Yarra Bent Park.

GSK

GSK uses an open office system with “hot desks”. Employees group together as work requires and connect their laptops to the desk they want to use.

GSK

Each employee has a designated locker.

GSK

Another part of the GSK work environment is the daily supply of fresh fruit. GSK promotes a healthy lifestyle.

GSK

Every cafeteria has a proper coffee machine, it is part of the induction to learn from a colleague how to use it, and all employees are regulars.

GSK

Parts of the work environment are large open areas with sofas and smaller desks, cafeterias on each floor and even a table tennis table.

GSK

The Recruitment Process

GSK


If you’re a student interested in a career at GSK, the Industry Based Learning (IBL) program is a great place to start. GSK’s IBL program is developed for undergraduate University students in their penultimate or final year of study upon commencement of the program.

The twelve-month, full time program is the perfect opportunity for students to launch their careers, offering invaluable hands-on work experience, building on their university learning and gaining a competitive advantage for all career paths. In 2019, GSK offered 52 places in the program across their three businesses in Australia and New Zealand.

If you’ve got a Bachelor or Master’s degree in business, commerce, engineering or human resources, as well as “a strong interest in general management and the real potential to be a future leader of the business” you can apply for the GSK Future Leaders Program.

These three-year programs will involve three to four rotations, placing you in different locations across Australia. Within each rotation you will work on an important project, making a valuable contribution to the business and challenging yourself to be the best you can be.

For both programs, the complete recruitment process takes around two months. It involves an online application, completing 1-3 online tests, a video interview and attending an assessment centre. You’ll maximise your chances of receiving an offer by demonstrating “ambition, commercial awareness and a self-motivated, proactive approach”. Throughout the recruitment process, keep in mind that GSK is looking for “clear, effective communicators who can quickly build a rapport with a wide range of people” and “adapt to change and keep focused when the pressure is on”.

If you’re a student interested in a career at GSK, the Industry Based Learning (IBL) program is a great place to start. GSK’s IBL program is developed for undergraduate University students in their penultimate or final year of study upon commencement of the program.

The twelve-month, full time program is the perfect opportunity for students to launch their careers, offering invaluable hands-on work experience, building on their university learning and gaining a competitive advantage for all career paths. In 2019, GSK offered 52 places in the program across their three businesses in Australia and New Zealand.

If you’ve got a Bachelor or Master’s degree in business, commerce, engineering or human resources, as well as “a strong interest in general management and the real potential to be a future leader of the business” you can apply for the GSK Future Leaders Program.

These three-year programs will involve three to four rotations, placing you in different locations across Australia. Within each rotation you will work on an important project, making a valuable contribution to the business and challenging yourself to be the best you can be.

For both programs, the complete recruitment process takes around two months. It involves an online application, completing 1-3 online tests, a video interview and attending an assessment centre. You’ll maximise your chances of receiving an offer by demonstrating “ambition, commercial awareness and a self-motivated, proactive approach”. Throughout the recruitment process, keep in mind that GSK is looking for “clear, effective communicators who can quickly build a rapport with a wide range of people” and “adapt to change and keep focused when the pressure is on”. You’ll need “the drive and confidence to trust your own judgment” while being “a real team player who actively collaborates with others”. You’ll also need “an analytical mind, a talent for multi-tasking and the ability to influence others”.

You’ll need “the drive and confidence to trust your own judgment” while being “a real team player who actively collaborates with others”. You’ll also need “an analytical mind, a talent for multi-tasking and the ability to influence others”.

GSK Videos

GSK


Meet Isaac - Chemical Engineer Graduate, Boronia

The GSK Story

Spectrum

Spectrum is GSK's employee resource group for LGBTQI employees and their straight allies.

Trek for Kids

Trek for Kids was a partnership between GSK and Save the Children, where 40 employees in 25 countries raised over 270,000 pounds for Save the Children, which was matched dollar for dollar by GSK.

GSK’s Industry Based Learning

For the following videos, please use the password GSK to download them from vimeo and embed the video files into the page.

GSK’s Modern Employer Program

GSK’s Industry Based Learning Program

GSK’s Pulse Program

Search

Enter an employer or university you want to find in our search bar.